Aug 11, 2022  
2022-23 University Catalog 
    
2022-23 University Catalog

Course Section Scheduling


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C O N T E N T S

Scheduling Timeline

Scheduling Procedure

Scheduling Policies

Spring & Summer 2023 Scheduling Timeline

Task  
Academic units plan course section offerings. 09/12/22 - 10/14/22
Academic units submit course section activation requests to the Office of the Registrar via onBase. 10/17/22 - 10/21/22
Review and resolve scheduling discrepancies. Finalize schedules. 10/24/22 - 10/28/22
Section activation request deadline. Requests received after this deadline will be processed. However, please try to submit all requests during the designated period. 10/28/22
The Office of the Registrar finalizes processing of all requests and publishes sections in Self Service, Canvas, and 25Live. 10/31/22 - 11/04/22
Advising begins. It is important for section offerings to be accurate and complete prior to the start of advising. 11/07/22
Academic units assign locations to course sections via 25Live. 11/07/22 - 12/02/22
Academic priority to locations expires. 12/02/22
Course section cancellation for low enrollment 1/12/23

Fall 2023 Scheduling Timeline

Task  
Academic units plan course section offerings 2/6/23 - 3/3/23
Academic units submit course section activation requests to the Office of the Registrar via onBase. 3/6/23 - 3/10/23
Review and resolve scheduling discrepancies. Finalize schedules. 3/13/23 - 3/17/23
Section activation request deadline. Requests received after this deadline will be processed. However, please try to submit all requests during the designated period. 3/17/23
The Office of the Registrar finalizes processing of all requests and publishes sections in Self Service, Canvas, and 25Live. 3/20/23 - 3/24/23
Advising begins. It is important for section offerings to be accurate and complete prior to the start of advising. 3/27/23
Academic units assign locations to course sections via 25Live. 3/27/23 - 4/24/23
Academic priority to locations expires. 4/24/23
Course section cancellation for low enrollment 8/17/23

Adding Sections

Academic units submit course section addition requests to the Office of the Registrar using the Course Section Activation OnBase form. After each form has been reviewed and processed, it will be routed back to the academic unit to audit and respond to any questions. Processed sections will automatically upload to the Canvas Learning Management System and to the 25Live Scheduling System.

Prior to submitting requests, please review the following sections:

Please also note the following:

  • Course section start and end dates must align with the term start and end dates. Sections are not permitted to run for only part of the term.
  • Meeting times submitted for remote sections must accurately reflect synchronous meetings, i.e. meeting times must reflect when faculty and students are synchronously engaged in course content and should not include time that students are working independently.
  • Course section capacities must be submitted accurately when a section addition is requested.

To add one or more course sections

  1. Log into OnBase
  2. Select New Form from the menu.
  3. From the SECT - Course Section Documents Section, select the Course Section Activation form.
  4. Complete and submit the form, which will be processed by the Office of the Registrar. An email notification will be sent once a request has been processed
  5. After a request has been processed academic units must verify the request. Instructions are included in the email notification.

Adding Selected Topics Sections

Selected topics are defined as courses that address a current or timely topic, are being piloted prior to being submitted for approval as a standing course, or will be one-time offerings. A given topic may run for a maximum of three terms; any subsequent offering requires the topic having been submitted and approved as a standing course in accordance with curricular policy and submission deadlines. Selected topics proposal are reviewed by the School Director, the Director of Learning Assessment, the Dean’s Office, the Office of the Registrar.

To schedule a selected topics course

  1. Submit a Selected Topics Course Section Proposal form located in:
    • The UArts Portal on the Forms & Requests page
    • OnBase, for users with access
  2. Once the proposal has been reviewed, email notifications are automatically sent to the proposal author, program director, and dean’s office.

Adding Travel Sections

Faculty propose new study away courses using the Selected Topics form. However, travel course proposals have an advanced deadline. For additional information refer to the Travel Course section on the Curricular Change Information & Forms page in the portal.

To schedule a travel course

  1. Submit a Selected Topics Course Section Proposal form located in:
    • The UArts Portal on the Forms & Requests page
    • OnBase, for users with access
  2. Once the proposal has been reviewed, email notifications are automatically sent to the proposal author, program director, and dean’s office.

Changing Sections

After advising & registration has begun adjustments to section meeting days and times should not be requested due to the impact such changes have on student schedules.

Adjustments to course sections should typically be limited to:

  • Adding or canceling course sections. Informed by section enrollments and waitlists. 
  • Additions of changes to faculty assignments.
  • Updates to the number of locations required for the course section.

To change one or more course sections:

  1. Log into OnBase
  2. Select New Form from the menu.
  3. From the SECT - Course Section Documents Section, select the Course Section Changes form.
  4. Complete and submit the form, which will be processed by the Office of the Registrar. An email notification will be sent once a request has been processed
  5. After a request has been processed academic units must verify the request. Instructions are included in the email notification.

Cancelling Course Sections

To cancel one or more course sections:

  1. Log into OnBase
  2. Select New Form from the menu.
  3. From the SECT - Course Section Documents Section, select the Course Section Cancellation form.
  4. Complete and submit the form, which will be processed by the Office of the Registrar. An email notification will be sent once a request has been processed
  5. After a request has been processed academic units must verify the request. Instructions are included in the email notification.

Assigning Locations to Sections

Location assignments for course sections are entered by academic units in 25Live. Access is restricted to designated users who have been trained by the Office of the Registrar and who have the necessary permissions assigned to their accounts in 25Live.

Course Section Availability in 25Live

Course sections are automatically uploaded to 25Live as Course Section Activation forms are processed. Data between the two systems automatically syncs every 6 minutes. Only course sections with in-person meetings are uploaded to 25Live. 

Course sections are visible in 25Live when:

  • they have one or more valid meeting patterns, i.e. a meeting day, start time, and end time.
  • they have an instructor method assigned that includes an in-person meetings:
    • ILEI: Intensive Learning Experience (In-person)
    • INTIO: Internship (In-person & online)
    • LECI: Lecture (In-person)
    • LECIO: Lecture (In-person & online)
    • LECSR: Lecture (Staggered in-person & remote)
    • LECSO: Lecture (Staggered in-person & online)
    • STUI: Studio (In-person)
    • STUIR: Studio (In-person & remote)
    • STUIO: Studio (In-person & online)
    • STUSR: Studio (Staggered in-person & remote)
    • STUSO: Studio (Staggered in-person & online)

If a course section is not visible in 25Live:

  1. Review the meeting information for the section via the current and upcoming section data dashboard located on the portal on the Registrar’s Refreshable Reports and Dashboards page.
  2. If meeting day, start time, or end time are missing from the refreshable, submit a revision to the Registrar. See Academic Units Submit Cancellation & Change Requests.
  3. If the meeting patterns are complete, contact the registrar@uarst.edu for assistance.

Assigning Locations to Course Sections

25Live Instructional Videos

Searching for Sections or Locations:

Assigning Locations:

Tracking:

Assign Locations

  1. Log in to 25Live
  2. From the Quick Search section, in the Event Search box, enter a course section. When entering the section do not use the asterisk delimiter. For example, enter: “AHST 101 01”
  3. Select the course section from the list of search results. To limit your results to only return sections meeting in the future select the “Future Only” filter option if the “All Dates” option is selected.
  4. From the Event Details page that loads, click Edit Event. The system will prompt you to select the meeting pattern for which you want to add a location when multiple meeting patterns exist. 
  5. From the event wizard that loads, navigate to the location section.
  6. Using the various search options, identify a suitable location for the course section
    • Location add options:
      • Request: location request will need to be approved by the person(s) responsible for that location before it is assigned to the course section.
      • Reserve: location request does not require approval and will be assigned to the course section after the event is saved.
      • Request Available / Reserve Available: the requested location is not available for all meeting times. Click conflict details to see which days the location is not available. When assigning a location to a course section that isn’t available on all meeting days, one or more additional locations must be assigned.
  7. Click Save 

Important Considerations

  • 25Live only sends location assignments back to the Colleague database. It is critical that academic units never alter any other information about a course section in 25Live. To add, change, or cancel a course section see the associated section.
  • Only one location can be assigned to each meeting pattern for a course section. When more than one location is assigned only one location will be sent back to Colleague. This limitation is due to how the data is stored in Colleague, 25Live does not prevent a user from adding additional locations. If multiple locations are assigned to a single meeting pattern they will periodically be deleted and overwritten as part of the integration between the Colleague and 25Live databases.
  • Locations with outstanding requests appear as available in 25Live, i.e. locations will appear as available, including no reference to a pending request, until and unless the pending request is approved.
  • 25Live will not prevent a location from being assigned to a section even if the section capacity exceeds the location capacity. The system will display an alert in red text that the room capacity is lower than the expected head count.
  • When a location is not available for every occurrence, it is important to communicate to faculty and students the days and locations when a course section will meet in an alternate location. To reserve alternate locations on days that a primary location is unavailble a separate event request should be submitted using the event type: Class Meeting (ad hoc only).

Academic Priority to Locations

Academic Locations

Course sections have priority access to academic locations (classrooms, studios, et cetera). 

Non-Academic Locations

Course sections may be scheduled in non-academic locations when pedagogically necessary. However, they are not granted priority access.

Non-academic locations include:

  • Art Alliance
  • Arts Bank
  • Beechman Theatre
  • Caplan Recital Hall
  • Caplan Studio Theater
  • CBS Auditorium
  • Chapel
  • Conference rooms
  • Furness Courtyard
  • Galleries
  • Levitt Auditorium
  • Levitt Foyer
  • Lobbies
  • Solmssen Court

If a non-academic location is unavailable for all scheduled course section meeting days/times, the academic unit submitting the request must find an alternate location for the course section to meet on days the location is unavailable. Such requests need to be submitted via 25Live and will need to be communicated to faculty and students by the academic unit.

Section Cancellation Due to Low Enrollment

The University reserves the right to cancel a course section due to low enrollment. Care must be taken when a course section is canceled to ensure student degree progress is not delayed.

Minimum Enrollment Requirement

Course sections must achieve the minimum enrollment requirement by the course section cancellation deadline. Sections that do not achieve minimum enrollment requirements will be recommended for cancellation by the Registrar in accordance with the scheduling timeline

Minimum enrollment requirements:

  • Critical Studies course sections = 75% minimum enrollment required
  • All other course sections = 50% minimum enrollment required

The minimum enrollment requirement does not apply to independent studies, internships, private lessons, mentored studio practice courses in the School of Dance, or ESL courses.

Exceptions Permitted

Academic units may exempt course sections from this policy on a case-by-case basis using one or more of the following criteria:

  • Required courses, when no suitable alternative course is available, and where cancellation would negatively impact student degree progress.
  • Courses with capacities exceeding 30 students, which are financially solvent to run with an enrollment lower than required minimum. (must have 10 or more students enrolled)
  • Advanced standing courses, 400 & 500 level.
  • Exceptional circumstances such as, but not limited to, first-time offered or program completion.

Cancellation Procedure

  1. The Registrar prompts academic units to review course sections that have not achieved minimum enrollment requirements approximately one week prior to the sectional cancellation for low enrollment deadline.
  2. Academic units review the Sections below the Minimum Enrollment Requirement component in the Section Cancellation Review Dashboard located on the Refreshable Reports & Dashboards page in the portal.
  3. Academic units submit course section cancellation requests in accordance with the course section cancellation procedure. Academic units should cancel all sections that have not achieved the minimum enrollment requirement, excluding those for which an exception is deemed necessary. 

Compliance Responsibility

The academic unit offering a course is responsible for ensuring that scheduling is consistent with the credit hour definitions for the instruction method of the course. As part of the approval process for new courses or course revisions, credit hours are reviewed by the Office of the Registrar.

Minor Changes to a Course

Minor changes to a course are reviewed by the Dean, Provost, and Office of the Registrar. Requests are accepted in accordance with the deadlines published on the curricular review calendar.

Minor changes to a course include:

  • Course types*
  • Contact hours
  • Default capacity
  • Department
  • Registration by petition
  • Registration restrictions
  • Requisites
  • Repeat policy
  • Session Cycle*
  • Yearly Cycle*

*Requests that only include updates to these fields go directly to the Registrar for processing, skipping Dean and Provost review. Requests to change business and fulfills CS elective requirements course types require review by Director of Critical Studies.

Requests to update any of the following are not considered minor changes and must be submited in accordance with the New or Changes to a Course deadlines on the curricular review calendar:

  • Academic level
  • Course description
  • Course number
  • Credit value
  • Grading scheme
  • Instructional method
  • Title (short & long)

Course Numbering

The Office of the Registrar assigns course numbers adhering to the following convention: SubjectCode*CourseNumber*SectionNumber, i.e. COMP*101*01. Some course numbers also include a suffix, for example COMP*111H*01.

Subject Codes

A subject code designates the area of study in a course. 

Subject codes include:

  • ADVT Advertising
  • AEDU Art Education
  • AETH Art Therapy
  • AHST Art History
  • AMSL American Sign Language
  • ANIM Animation
  • ANTH Anthropology
  • BOOK Book Arts
  • BUSN Business
  • CERA Ceramics
  • CIM Immersive Media
  • COMP Written Composition
  • CRFT Crafts Core
  • CRIT Critical Dialogues
  • CRTY Creativity
  • CRWT Creative Writing
  • DAAT Design, Art + Technology
  • DANC Dance
  • DESN Design
  • DRAW Drawing
  • DVPP Devised Perf Practice
  • EDPD Ed. Program Design
  • EDUC Educational Practices
  • ENVI Environment
  • ESLI English As 2nd Language
  • ETEC Educational Technology
  • FIBR Fibers
  • FIDE Film Design
  • FILM Film
  • FINA Fine Arts
  • FMST Film & Media Studies
  • FRCH French
  • GAMA Game Art
  • GDES Graphic Design
  • GLAS Glass
  • GRAD Graduate Studies
  • HIST History
  • HNRS University Honors Prog
  • IDES Industrial Design
  • ILUS Illustration
  • IMAG Image
  • INCL Inclusion
  • ITAL Italian
  • IXDE Interaction Design
  • LITT Literary Studies
  • LITY Literacy
  • MATH Mathematics
  • MBET Music, Busn, Entrpeneur & Tech
  • METL Metals
  • MMED Music Education
  • MSEM Museum Studies
  • MUCP Music - Composition
  • MUED Music Education
  • MULS Applied Major Lessons
  • MUNM Music - Non-Major
  • MUPF Music - Performance
  • MUSC Music
  • OBJT Object
  • PDES Product Design
  • PHIL Philosophy
  • PHOT Photography
  • PNTG Painting
  • PRES Museum Resources
  • PRNT Printmaking
  • PSYC Psychology
  • RELI Religion
  • SCIE Sciences
  • SCLP Sculpture
  • SOAC School of Art Core
  • SOCI Sociology
  • SPAN Spanish
  • STET Ed Tech Trends
  • STIP Inclusionary Practice
  • STME Music Education
  • STMR Museum Resources
  • STPF Performance Studies
  • STPS Primary Sources
  • STTA Visual Arts Topics
  • TDTC Theater Desn Tech Craft
  • TDTP Theater Desn Tech Pract
  • THEA Theater
  • THMD Theater Movemnt & Dance
  • THPD Theater Prod. & Design
  • THST Theater Studio
  • THVC Theater Voice & Speech
  • TIME Time
  • UTPS Teach With Primary Srcs
  • VPAS Visual Arts
  • WFTV Writing for Film + TV
  • WOOD Wood

Course Levels

  • 001 - 099 Developmental
    Courses do not satisfy degree requirements at the graduate or undergraduate level.
  • 100 - 199 Lower Level Undergraduate
    Courses are broad surveys or introductions to a particular discipline.  These courses do not have prerequisites, with the exception of those that are sequential courses.
  • 200 - 299 Lower Level Undergraduate
    Courses are introductions to or principles of areas of study within a discipline.  Courses may or may not have prerequisites.
  • 300 - 399 Upper Level Undergraduate
    This level is reserved for advanced courses, providing depth or study in a specialized topic.  Courses often have prerequisites, or assume readiness for advanced level study.
  • 400 - 499 Upper Level Undergraduate
    This level is reserved for highly specialized courses, including capstones.  Prerequisites, a level of readiness, or advancement within the major may be required for this advanced level work.
  • 500 - 599 Upper Level Undergraduate/Graduate
    Courses can be completed by undergraduate students for undergraduate credit or graduate students for graduate credit.
  • 600 - 699 First Year Master’s
    These courses are generally intended for Master’s degree students in their first year.
  • 700 - 799 Second Year Master’s
    These courses are generally intended for Master’s degree students in their second year.
  • 800 - 899 Upper Level Graduate
    These courses are generally intended for PhD degree students.

Reserved Course Numbers

The following course numbers are reserved for use with approved subject codes as follows:

  • Selected Topics: 198, 298, 398, 498, 598, 698, 798
  • Independent Study: 490, 790
  • Internship: 499, 799

Course Number Suffixes

Course number suffixes are designations that appear at the end of course numbers to indicate specific kinds of courses. For example COMP*111H - Written Composition I: Honors

  • E: English Second Language
  • G: Graduate
  • H: Honors
  • P: Pass/Fail
  • S: Screening Section

Course Number Reuse

Once a course number has been retired, that number shall not be used again for ten years.

Course Types

Course types act as filters in the self-service course catalog and can leveraged when defining program requirements. For example, the business course type can be used to identify all business courses, including those that do not have a BUSN subject code. Courses types are optional additions to courses, which facilitate student course discovery and planning. Course types can be used by students to filter course offerings in student self-service. Requests for new course types are reviewed by the Registrar.

Course Type Approval Used in program requirements? Available in self-service course type search? Description
Business Director of Critical Studies  Yes Yes

Open to all majors, offers entry points for success central to creative entrepreneurship or being part of a business enterprise, and intersects with general education learning outcomes. See also Guidelines for Courses in Critical Studies & Courses Intended for CS Credit.

Collaborative Registrar No Yes

Open to all majors, courses in which two or more disciplines interact or cooperate in a synergistic manner.

Discipline History Director of Critical Studies Yes Yes

Open to all majors, examines an art form or general creative field from a contextual or critical standpoint not grounded in studio practice assessment, and intersects with general education learning objectives. See also Guidelines for Courses in Critical Studies & Courses Intended for CS Credit.

Drawing Registrar No Yes Open to all majors, courses in which drawing is either the primary focus or, for multidisciplinary courses, an integral component.
Entrepreneurship Registrar No Yes

Open to all majors, courses foster the development of leadership skills. Specifically a willingness to take risk and exercise initiative, taking advantage of market opportunities by planning, organizing and deploying resources, often by innovating to create new or improving existing products or services. Additionally social, environmental or humanitarian goals may be elevated.

Fulfills Critical Studies Elective Director of Critical Studies Yes Yes

Open to all majors and intersects with general education learning objectives in ways that are not grounded in studio practice assessment. See also Guidelines for Courses in Critical Studies & Courses Intended for CS Credit.

Fundamental Registrar Yes No This course type is reserved for use only with academic programs whose program requirements are defined dynamically. For example, complete 6 credits, from subject = ANIM, level = 200, course type = fundamental. It supports the ability to define a program dynamically by providing additional nuance beyond the subject code and course level. The fundamental course type can be used to limit the courses that can fulfill a given requirement to those that are considered fundamental to the program.
Independent Study Registrar No Yes Administratively applied to courses by the Office of the Registrar, primarily used to track capitated courses for Affordable Care Act compliance.
Internship Registrar No Yes Administratively assigned by the Office of the Registrar, primarily used to track capitated courses for Affordable Care Act compliance.
Introductory Registrar No Yes

Open to all majors, courses are at the 100 or 200 level and do not include a requisite.

Jefferson MEPD Pathway Registrar No Yes Courses approved to be enrolled in by Jefferson students participating in the MEPD pathway program.
Open to Peirce Students Registrar No Yes Courses approved to be enrolled in by students from Peirce College
Private Music Lesson Registrar No No Administratively assigned by the Office of the Registrar, primarily used to track capitated courses for Affordable Care Act compliance.
Selected Topics Registrar No Yes Administratively assigned by the Office of the Registrar for tracking purposes.
Technology Registrar No Yes Open to all majors, courses place a heavy emphasis on technology
Thesis Registrar No No Administratively assigned by the Office of the Registrar, primarily used to track capitated courses for Affordable Care Act compliance.
Travel Course Registrar No Yes Administratively assigned by the Office of the Registrar for tracking purposes.

To request an update to a course type:

Requests that include changes to course types which are used in program requirements require curricular review and should be submitted in accordance with the curricular review calendar. 

Requests that only include a change to a course type which isn’t used in program requirements (i.e. Collaborative, Entrepreneurship, Introductory, or Technology) can be submitted at any time. Requests will be reviewed and processed by the Registrar in accordance with the descriptions listed above. Requests that include any additional changes beyond the designated course types will be held pending curricular review.

  1. Log into OnBase
  2. Select New Form from the menu.
  3. From the Curricular Change Documents Section, select the Changes to a Course form.
  4. Complete and submit the form, which will be processed by the Office of the Registrar. An email notification will be sent once a request has been processed

Guidelines for Courses in Critical Studies & Courses Intended for CS Credit

Overview

Curricular Blocks

General Submission Process

Proposals for courses intended for credit in the Critical Studies Program should be submitted for review by the University Curriculum Committee through OnBase. Prior to submission to OnBase, faculty must discuss possible plans with the Critical Studies Program director. 

Submissions are encouraged to include a detailed course syllabus. Any supplementary documents, such as syllabi, must be submitted to regscans@uarts.edu. 

The curriculum review process includes a review of the student learning outcomes (SLOs) for all proposed courses and special topics course sections. If you are planning to propose a new course or a special topics course section, send your proposed SLOs along with the course description to the director of assessment, Tracy Bartholomew (tbartholomew@uarts.edu), before submitting your proposal in OnBase. Reviewing the SLOs before they are put into OnBase will allow for a more efficient review of the proposals. Guidelines on how to write effective student learning outcomes can be accessed in the UArts portal.

General Course Guidelines for the Critical Studies Program

  • Courses must require no studio skills or specialized disciplinary knowledge, as they must be open for credit — required and/or elective — to all students from all fields of study.
  • Courses in critical studies (CS) require regular — i.e., weekly — reading assignments. Readings must embody relevant, contemporary discourse related to course scope and appropriate curricular objectives and learning outcomes.
  • Courses in CS require periodic writing assignments that engage students in critical thinking and reflection. The writing assignments must also emphasize excellence in communication fundamentals (e.g., writing for general clarity via organization and development of ideas). The writing assignments may consist of longer essays, but may also take the form of weekly or bi-weekly responses to readings or events, short papers responding to particular aspects of readings or other texts, or reflective/critical journal entries. Instructors may also engage forms of critical response like visual essays with written components, for example.
  • The guidelines presented here are by no means exhaustive and faculty or potential faculty teaching courses overseen by CS should address questions to the CS program director.

Courses Intended to Fulfill Critical Dialogues Requirements

  • Critical Dialogues (CRIT) courses examine issues and topics related to arts and their relationships to cultures from a variety of perspectives. CRIT course topics introduce students to ways of reflecting critically on issues and questions central to creative endeavors and contemporary society.
  • The following are general, overarching guidelines for CRIT courses: 
    1. CRIT course themes are topical, relevant to contemporary artists, designers, performers, and writers and their broader cultural, social, and societal contexts, and draw on interdisciplinary sources. These sources include a diversity of artistic mediums, such as fine arts, film, music, dance, theater, design, writing and literature.
    2. CRIT courses must engage the arts as a broad, expansive, and interdisciplinary category. 
  • CRIT course objectives are as follows: 
    1. Think, read, write and discuss from a variety of informed, critical perspectives; 
    2. Access information from a multitude of sources and assess their reliability and relevance while examining a topic or theme using multiple critical lenses recognize the moral and ethical implications of research on issues central to contemporary cultures and arts; 
    3. Recognize contemporary issues central to the arts, culture, and society.

Courses Intended to Fulfill Critical Studies Electives Requirements

  • This section on critical studies electives is not intended to be comprehensive and provides snapshots of sub-curricular areas currently offered in this curricular area. Courses specific to major disciplines, including discipline histories or critical approaches to a specific discipline, should be offered by a school, though they may speak to guidelines here for critical studies electives. If interested in offering a course in your school as a critical studies elective, please contact the Critical Studies Program director for further information.
  • Elective courses in CS uphold our commitments to critical inquiry and engagement of student artists through a variety of critical lenses and discourses. These lenses and discourses draw upon and create connections between disciplines in interdisciplinary fields like – but not limited to — critical theory, cultural studies, language studies, and sciences. 
  • Learning objectives for elective courses intersect with learning objectives for other courses within CS. The following are objectives central to the electives that transcend any specific disciplinary boundaries: 
    1. demonstrate skills in interpretive reading, critical thinking, research techniques, and written and verbal communication;
    2. deploy appropriate methods for critical inquiry and interdisciplinary fields; 
    3. access and assess appropriate research sources; 
    4. deploy appropriate primary and secondary sources in ways that inform a scholarly paper, presentation, or other critical project.

Business

  • Business courses in CS uphold our commitments to providing students from all fields of study at UArts entry points for success central to creative entrepreneurship or being part of a business enterprise in the 21st century. 
  • Learning outcomes for business courses intersect with learning outcomes specific to other courses overseen by CS. Specifically, these outcomes are framed by business minor program objectives. CS houses the business minor. 
  1. Possess essential business knowledge in the foundational areas of marketing, communications, and business.
  2. Possess advanced writing and presentation skills.
  3. Understand e-commerce and be able to identify and use emerging technologies.
  4. Collaborate and partner with other University students and departments as well as professional organizations.
  5. Be information literate, aware, resourceful, and problem-solving critical thinkers.

Critical Studies Study Away

  • Study away courses in CS uphold our commitments to critical inquiry and engagement of student artists through travel experiences. These experiences prompt students to reflect on their respective roles as student-artists in global contexts.
  • Learning outcomes for study away courses intersect with learning outcomes specific to other courses overseen by CS. The following are outcomes central to the courses that transcend any specific disciplinary boundaries. After completing a study away critical studies course, students will be able to:
  1. Reflect on — both in writing and verbally — connections between the study away experience and personal, cultural, and creative contexts. 
  2. Develop a critical language about the study away experience through synthesizing readings on related topics, issues, and themes.
  3. Collect, archive, and analyze research sources linked to study away experience.
  4. Theorize a more globally conscious way of analyzing art, culture, and self. 
  5. Language courses: demonstrate increased proficiency in language skills — including reading, writing, and verbal communication — and the cultural components of these skills.
  • Additional outcomes: Depending on the context of the study-away experiences (longer study away courses, study away courses with close interaction with study away communities doing community service and/or teaching in schools, and semester-long study away), these additional outcomes should be considered:
    • Identify cultural differences and the role of culture in shaping values, beliefs, and practices, and perceptions
    • Reflect critically on one’s own culture and values, beliefs, and practices
    • Interact in a culturally appropriate manner with those from a different culture or cultural background
    • Manage the challenges of daily life in a different culture through applying skills and attitudes like curiosity, adaptability, tolerance for ambiguity, resilience, creativity, independence, and ability to problem-solve
    • Collaborate effectively with creative partners whose ethno-cultural moorings are different from their own
  • Questions regarding study away opportunities and mechanics should be addressed to the International Student Programs office. 

Discipline History

  • Discipline History (DH) courses must observe all general course guidelines listed above. 
  • The course must examine an art form or general creative field from a contextual or critical standpoint. Context, for this course, includes both the history of a medium’s development (e.g., photography from the daguerreotype to digital photography) and the social and cultural context of that development. Critical standpoint refers to examining a creative form or field from the lenses of critique and reflective assessment not based in studio practice.
  • The ultimate goal of DH courses: to develop students’ understandings of and appreciations for art forms or creative fields and their unique contexts.

Science

  • Courses take their subject matter from academic disciplines which fall under the general category of the sciences, including the physical sciences, life sciences, and social sciences. These may be singular or interdisciplinary in nature. 
  • Courses devote a significant portion of their content to the nature and methodology of the scientific enterprise, both what it is and how it is conducted. This material should be understood to be applicable to any of the empirical sciences, though examples will typically be drawn from the particular scientific disciplines of the course. This general treatment of the nature of science may take the form of a discrete section of the course (e.g., a three-week unit) or be integrated into other substantive course content with the proviso that it will be a significant emphasis. 
  • Courses require students to demonstrate familiarity with science literature and respond to its claims. This response may take the form of a paper or project involving either actual scientific research or the analysis of existing scientific research. 
  • Science is the body of knowledge that represents our current understanding of natural systems and the process whereby that knowledge has been established, continually extended, refined, and revised. Science comprises a set of courses that introduce students to scientific methodology and critical thinking. The ultimate goal of these courses: inspiring curiosity about the world around us and introducing quantitative and qualitative methods of understanding that world. 
  • Courses offered under the science curriculum must include all course outcomes. The outcomes included in syllabi must be tailored to the respective course content or topic. Student learning outcomes:
  1. Understand the nature of science and how scientific research is conducted.
  2. Analyze evidence and formulate a conjecture about its meaning.
  3. Develop a broad-based understanding of the discipline and how it fits into the broader scientific enterprise and its importance to modern society.
  4. Develop competency in reading, understanding, and critically evaluating scientific information in various forms.
  5. Communicate scientific ideas clearly, both orally and in writing.

Contact & Credit Hours

  • Contact hour One hour of scheduled instruction presented to students.
  • Preparation hour One hour of outside of class or nonscheduled preparation work the typical student is expected to complete.
  • Semester Credit Hour the amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than:
    • One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or
    • At least an equivalent amount of work for other academic activities including studio work, laboratory work, internships, practica, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

Delivery Methods

Delivery Method Engagement Description & Meeting Times
In-Person Synchronous

All meeting times are in-person, listed in Colleague, and appear in student self-service.

Remote Synchronous

A remote class is similar to an in-person class except that students and instructor interact remotely instead of in-person. Meeting times are listed in Colleague and appear in student self-service.

Online Asynchronous

Classes do no have scheduled meeting times. Assignments and deadlines are determined by the instructor, with students completing work when their schedule permits. No meeting times will be listed in Colleague or appear in student self-service.

Remote & Online Hybrid

Combining the remote and online delivery methods, students complete a portion of the course remotely and the rest online. Classes include set meeting times when students and instructor meet remotely. Remote meeting times are listed in Colleague and appear in student self-service.

In-person & Remote Synchronous

Combining the in-person and remote delivery methods, students complete a portion of the course in-person and the rest remotely. In-person and remote meeting times are listed in Colleague and appear in student self-service.

In-person & Online Hybrid Combining the in-person and online delivery methods, students complete a portion of the course in-person and the rest online. In-person meeting times are listed in Colleague and appear in student self-service.
Staggered In-person & Remote Synchronous In this method, class is divided into groups which rotate between meeting in-person & remotely during scheduled meeting times. In-person and remote meeting times will be listed in Colleague and appear in student self-service. Faculty identify groups and in-person meeting schedules to students.
Staggered In-Person & Online Hybrid

In this method, class is divided into groups which rotate between meeting in-person during scheduled meeting times and completing on-line asynchronous work. All in-person meeting times will be listed in Colleague and appear in student self-service. Faculty identify groups and in-person meeting schedules to students.

Engagement Definitions

  • Synchronous: A class that focuses on concurrent, collective, and collaborative learning amongst students, may be in-person or remote. Requires regularly scheduled meeting times between instructor and students for the duration of the term. Regularly scheduled meeting times constitute the required contact time for a particular instructional method. Synchronous contact time occurs in real time, meaning that the students and instructor are engaged in learning activities simultaneously. Synchronous learning activities include lectures, discussions (in-person or virtual), demonstrations, group projects (during class time), labs, studios, videos (watched as a class), real-time document/file sharing and editing, etc. The class may meet in-person at a particular location or it may meet remotely via Zoom or other electronic means. Synchronous classes may include asynchronous electronic resources and use of the LMS, in which case these resources are treated as ancillary to print or other resources (textbook, handouts, etc.) and not as central required asynchronous components of the class, as with asynchronous and hybrid engagement methods.
  • Asynchronous: A class that may be self-paced, individual or intermittently collaborative, requires that the content of the class be delivered using methods that do not rely on scheduled meeting times. Asynchronous delivery does not occur in real time, meaning that class learning activities need not be carried out simultaneously. This does not preclude remote meetings between faculty and students or between students and other students; such meetings are scheduled between faculty and students directly. The LMS, may include synchronous components using real-time videoconferencing, and asynchronous components, such as discussion boards, streamed video and audio files, blogs, wikis, document sharing, assignments completed outside scheduled class times, etc.

  • Hybrid: A class in which part of the contact time of a synchronous class is replaced by a required asynchronous component, thus reducing the amount of required scheduled contact time. When hybrid classes have less synchronous time than a standard synchronous class the expected student commitment to the asynchronous component is increased in compliance with the required number of contact hours for the instructional method. The amount of time a particular class will actually meet synchronously is then listed in the schedule of classes, which will be fewer hours than the non-hybrid class; times can not be altered in an ad hoc manner.

Instructional Methods

Credit-to-contact ratios listed below are the minimum University standards. Some programs may require more to fulfill accreditation, certification, or other requirements.


Dissertation

Preparation of a scholarly paper completed by a candidate for a doctoral degree. This instructional method is restricted for use by the PhD program only.

    Fall & Spring Semester Summer Terms
Credits Student engagement per term 15-week (hrs/week) 10-week (hrs/week) 8-week (hrs/week) 5-week (hrs/week)
1 45 hrs 3 hrs 4.5 hrs 5.5 hrs 9 hrs
1.5 67.5 hrs 4.5 hrs 6.75 hrs 8.5 hrs 13.5 hrs
3.0 135 hrs 9 hrs 13.5 hrs 17 hrs 27 hrs

Colleague Instructor method

The following combinations of delivery & instructional method are permitted. The code & description used in Colleague have been included. Please note: In the catalog we refer to both delivery method and instructional method. However in Colleague there is only a single field called “instructor method;” the instructor method in Colleague is a concatenation of what is referred to in the catalog as a delivery method and instructional method. 

In-person (I) Remote (R) Online (O) Remote & Online (RO) In-person & Remote (IR) In-person & Online (IO) Staggered In-person & Remote (SR) Staggered In-person & Online (SO)
N/A N/A DISO N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Independent Study

Self-directed study on a topic not substantially covered in a regularized course in the catalog. Requires intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

    Fall & Spring Semester Summer Terms
Credits Student engagement per term 15-week (hrs/week) 10-week (hrs/week) 8-week (hrs/week) 5-week (hrs/week)
1 45 hrs 3 hrs 4.5 hrs 5.5 hrs 9 hrs
1.5 67.5 hrs 4.5 hrs 6.75 hrs 8.5 hrs 13.5 hrs
3.0 135 hrs 9 hrs 13.5 hrs 17 hrs 27 hrs

Colleague Instructor method

The following combinations of delivery & instructional method are permitted. The code & description used in Colleague have been included. Please note: In the catalog we refer to both delivery method and instructional method. However in Colleague there is only a single field called “instructor method;” the instructor method in Colleague is a concatenation of what is referred to in the catalog as a delivery method and instructional method. 

In-person (I) Remote (R) Online (O) Remote & Online (RO) In-person & Remote (IR) In-person & Online (IO) Staggered In-person & Remote (SR) Staggered In-person & Online (SO)
N/A N/A INDO N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Intensive Learning Experience

Condensed workshops designed to immerse students in practical situations using simulations and case analysis. This instructional method is restricted for use by the PhD program only.

    Fall & Spring Semester Summer Terms
  Student engagement per term 15-week (hrs/week) 10-week (hrs/week) 8-week (hrs/week) 5-week (hrs/week)
Credits Contact* Contact* Contact* Contact* Contact*
1 45 hrs 3 hrs 4.5 hrs 5.5 hrs 9 hrs
1.5 67.5 hrs 4.5 hrs 6.75 hrs 8.5 hrs 13.5 hrs
3.0 135 hrs 9 hrs 13.5 hrs 17 hrs 27 hrs

*Contact minimum hours listed only apply to course sections offered in-person. For additional information see Delivery Method & Credit Hour Equivalencies.

Colleague Instructor method

The following combinations of delivery & instructional method are permitted. The code & description used in Colleague have been included. Please note: In the catalog we refer to both delivery method and instructional method. However in Colleague there is only a single field called “instructor method;” the instructor method in Colleague is a concatenation of what is referred to in the catalog as a delivery method and instructional method. 

In-person (I) Remote (R) Online (O) Remote & Online (RO) In-person & Remote (IR) In-person & Online (IO) Staggered In-person & Remote (SR) Staggered In-person & Online (SO)
ILEI N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Internship

Supervised career-related experience conducted in a work environment outside of the traditional academic setting.

    Fall & Spring Semester Summer Terms
  Student engagement per term 15-week (hrs/week) 10-week (hrs/week) 8-week (hrs/week) 5-week (hrs/week)
Credits Total Contact* Preparation* Contact* Preparation* Contact* Preparation* Contact* Preparation* Contact* Preparation*
1 45 hrs 30 hrs 15 hrs 2 hrs 1 hr 3 hrs 1.5 hrs 3.75 hrs 2 hrs 6 hrs 3 hrs
1.5 67.5 hrs 45 hrs 22.5 hrs 3 hrs 1.5 hrs 4.5 hrs 2.25 hrs 5.5 hrs 3 hrs 9 hrs 4.5 hrs
3.0 135 hrs 90 hrs 45 hrs 6 hrs 3 hrs 9 hrs 4.5 hrs 11.25 hrs 5.5 hrs 18 hrs 9 hrs

*Contact and preparation minimum hours listed only apply to course sections offered in-person. For additional information see Delivery Method & Credit Hour Equivalencies.

Colleague Instructor method

The following combinations of delivery & instructional method are permitted. The code & description used in Colleague have been included. Please note: In the catalog we refer to both delivery method and instructional method. However in Colleague there is only a single field called “instructor method;” the instructor method in Colleague is a concatenation of what is referred to in the catalog as a delivery method and instructional method. 

In-person (I) Remote (R) Online (O) Remote & Online (RO) In-person & Remote (IR) In-person & Online (IO) Staggered In-person & Remote (SR) Staggered In-person & Online (SO)
N/A N/A N/A INTRO N/A INTIO N/A N/A

Lecture

A course in which the primary emphasis is on transmitting a body of knowledge, explaining ideas or principles, and/or modeling skills. In some courses, students may be expected to participate in classroom activities by means appropriate to the subject matter, such as discussion, performance, skill development, et cetera.

    Fall & Spring Semester Summer Terms
  Student engagement per term 15-week (hrs/week) 10-week (hrs/week) 8-week (hrs/week) 5-week (hrs/week)
Credits Total Contact* Preparation* Contact* Preparation* Contact* Preparation* Contact* Preparation* Contact* Preparation*
1 45 hrs 15 hrs 30 hrs 1 hr 2 hrs 1.5 hrs 3 hrs 2 hrs 3.75 hrs 3 hrs 6 hrs
1.5 67.5 hrs 22.5 hrs 45 hrs 1.5 hrs 3 hrs 2.25 hrs 4.5 hrs 2.75 hrs 5.5 hrs 4.5 hrs 9 hrs
3.0 135 hrs 45 hrs 90 hrs 3 hrs 6 hrs 4.5 hrs 9 hrs 5.5 hrs 11.25 hrs 9 hrs 18 hrs

*Contact and preparation minimum hours listed only apply to course sections offered in-person. For additional information see Delivery Method & Credit Hour Equivalencies.

Colleague Instructor method

The following combinations of delivery & instructional method are permitted. The code & description used in Colleague have been included. Please note: In the catalog we refer to both delivery method and instructional method. However in Colleague there is only a single field called “instructor method;” the instructor method in Colleague is a concatenation of what is referred to in the catalog as a delivery method and instructional method. 

In-person (I) Remote (R) Online (O) Remote & Online (RO) In-person & Remote (IR) In-person & Online (IO) Staggered In-person & Remote (SR) Staggered In-person & Online (SO)
LECI LECR LECO LECRO LECIR LECIO LECSR LECSO

Private Lesson

Individualized instruction typically in the study of the performing arts. Section meeting days/times are scheduled directly between the instructor and the student.

   
  Student engagement per term
Credits Total Contact* Preparation*
1 45 hrs 5 hrs 40 hrs
1.5 67.5 hrs 7.5 hrs 60 hrs
3.0 135 hrs 15 hrs 120 hrs

*Contact and preparation minimum hours listed only apply to course sections offered in-person. For additional information see Delivery Method & Credit Hour Equivalencies.

Colleague Instructor method

The following combinations of delivery & instructional method are permitted. The code & description used in Colleague have been included. Please note: In the catalog we refer to both delivery method and instructional method. However in Colleague there is only a single field called “instructor method;” the instructor method in Colleague is a concatenation of what is referred to in the catalog as a delivery method and instructional method. 

In-person (I) Remote (R) Online (O) Remote & Online (RO) In-person & Remote (IR) In-person & Online (IO) Staggered In-person & Remote (SR) Staggered In-person & Online (SO)
LESI LESR N/A N/A LESIR N/A N/A N/A

Research

Independent research done by a student working toward a larger project, such as a master’s thesis, senior project, or dissertation. 

    Fall & Spring Semester Summer Terms
  Student engagement per term 15-week (hrs/week) 10-week (hrs/week) 8-week (hrs/week) 5-week (hrs/week)
Credits Total Contact* Preparation* Contact* Preparation* Contact* Preparation* Contact* Preparation* Contact* Preparation*
1 45 hrs 15 hrs 30 hrs 1 hrs 2 hrs 1.5 hrs 3 hrs 2 hrs 3.75 hrs 3 hrs 6 hrs
1.5 67.5 hrs 22.5 hrs 45 hrs 1.5 hrs 3 hrs 2.25 hrs 4.5 hrs 2.75 hrs 5.5 hrs 4.5 hrs 9 hrs
3.0 135 hrs 45 hrs 90 hrs 3 hrs 6 hrs 4.5 hrs 9 hrs 5.5 hrs 11.25 hrs 9 hrs 18 hrs

*Contact and preparation minimum hours listed only apply to course sections offered in-person. For additional information see Delivery Method & Credit Hour Equivalencies.

Colleague Instructor method

The following combinations of delivery & instructional method are permitted. The code & description used in Colleague have been included. Please note: In the catalog we refer to both delivery method and instructional method. However in Colleague there is only a single field called “instructor method;” the instructor method in Colleague is a concatenation of what is referred to in the catalog as a delivery method and instructional method. 

In-person (I) Remote (R) Online (O) Remote & Online (RO) In-person & Remote (IR) In-person & Online (IO) Staggered In-person & Remote (SR) Staggered In-person & Online (SO)
N/A N/A RES N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Ratio of Contact to Preparation Hours

Each credit requires a total of 45 hours of combined contact & preparation time; there is no minimum on the number of contact hours required. During periods of independent research, the number of contact hours can be reduced when the number of preparatory is increased by an equal amount.


Studio

A course with primary emphasis on student activity leading to skill development and the enhancement of the student’s design or performance ability and/or artistic growth. Evaluation of individual learning may include public display of proficiency and/or evaluation by faculty other than the student’s instructor.

    Fall & Spring Semester Summer Terms
  Student engagement per term 15-week (hrs/week) 10-week (hrs/week) 8-week (hrs/week) 5-week (hrs/week)
Credits Total Contact Preparation Contact Preparation Contact Preparation Contact Preparation Contact Preparation
1 45 hrs 22.5 hrs 22.5 hrs 1.5 hrs 1.5 hrs 2.25 hrs 2.25 hrs 2.75 hrs 2.75 hrs 4.5 hrs 4.5 hrs
1.5 67.5 hrs 33.75 hrs 33.75 hrs 2.25 hrs 2.25 hrs 3.5 hrs 3.5 hrs 4.25 hrs 4.25 hrs 6.75 hrs 6.75 hrs
2.0 90 hrs 45 hrs 45 hrs 3 hrs 3 hrs 4.5 hrs 4.5 hrs 5.5 hrs 5.5 hrs 9 hrs 9 hrs
3.0 135 hrs 67.5 hrs 67.5 hrs 4.5 hrs 4.5 hrs 6.75 hrs 6.75 hrs 8.5 hrs 8.5 hrs 13.5 hrs 13.5 hrs
6.0 270 hrs 135 hrs 135 hrs 9 hrs 9 hrs 13.5 hrs 13.5 hrs 17 hrs 17 hrs 27 hrs 27 hrs

*Contact and preparation minimum hours listed only apply to course sections offered in-person. For additional information see Delivery Method & Credit Hour Equivalencies.

Colleague Instructor method

The following combinations of delivery & instructional method are permitted. The code & description used in Colleague have been included. Please note: In the catalog we refer to both delivery method and instructional method. However in Colleague there is only a single field called “instructor method;” the instructor method in Colleague is a concatenation of what is referred to in the catalog as a delivery method and instructional method. 

In-person (I) Remote (R) Online (O) Remote & Online (RO) In-person & Remote (IR) In-person & Online (IO) Staggered In-person & Remote (SR) Staggered In-person & Online (SO)
STUI STUR STUO STURO STUIR STUIO STUSR STUSO

Travel Course

Short-term travel experiences guided by the faculty. Planned contact hours with students before, during, and after travel must be documented in the course syllabus.

  Student engagement per term
Credits Total Contact Preparation
1 45 hrs 15 hrs 30 hrs
1.5 67.5 hrs 22.5 hrs 45 hrs
2.0 90 hrs 30 hrs 60 hrs
3.0 135 hrs 45 hrs 90 hrs

*Contact and preparation minimum hours listed only apply to course sections offered in-person. For additional information see Delivery Method & Credit Hour Equivalencies.

Colleague Instructor method

The following combinations of delivery & instructional method are permitted. The code & description used in Colleague have been included. Please note: In the catalog we refer to both delivery method and instructional method. However in Colleague there is only a single field called “instructor method;” the instructor method in Colleague is a concatenation of what is referred to in the catalog as a delivery method and instructional method. 

In-person (I) Remote (R) Online (O) Remote & Online (RO) In-person & Remote (IR) In-person & Online (IO) Staggered In-person & Remote (SR) Staggered In-person & Online (SO)
TRVI N/A N/A N/A TRVIR TRVIO N/A N/A

Ratio of Contact to Preparation Hours

Each credit requires a total of 45 hours of combined contact & preparation time; a minimum of 15 contact hours is required.

When a travel course includes more than the required minimum number of contact hours the number of preparation hours can be reduced by an equal amount, i.e. a 1 credit travel course that includes 20 contact hours would only require 25 preparation hours.

Travel Course Contact & Preparation Requirements

In addition to the the standard semester credit hour, contact hour, and preparation hour definitions the additional requirements apply to travel courses.

Contact Hours May Include

  • Scheduled course meetings before, during, and after the dates of travel
  • Lectures or seminars with the faculty, guest lecturers, members of partner institutions, guides, local residents, et cetera
  • Student presentations

Preparation Hours May Include

  • Time to read assigned texts
  • Site visits, organized cultural excursions, and performances that engage students with the learning objectives of the course
  • Service learning projects
  • Synthesis and reflection including writing, discussion, or the production of creative work

Contact & Preparation Hours May Not Include

  • Travel time
  • Meals
  • Social activities that are not instructor-led and tied to specific learning outcomes for the course

Crosslisting Course Sections

Crosslisting course sections allow two or more sections that have the same meeting pattern, faculty member, and room assignment to be associated. When crosslisting course sections one section is designated as the primary section, while all other sections are designated secondary sections.

Section Capacity versus Global Capacity

In addition to the section capacity, crosslisted sections include a global capacity. The global capacity controls the combined enrollment of primary and secondary course sections and can be set strategically to control enrollment. When crosslisting course sections, if a global capacity is not set both sections can fill to their designated capacity, i.e. if both sections have a capacity of 15 students a total of 30 students would be able to enroll in the crosslisted sections, 15 in each.

Example when section and global capacities are the same: If the section capacity of two crosslisted course sections is set to 15 and the global capacity is set to 15 a maximum of 15 students will be able to enroll in the two sections.

Example when section and global capacities are the different: If the capacity of the primary section to 15, the secondary section to 5, and the global capacity to 15 a maximum of 15 students will be able to enroll in the two sections, up to 15 in the primary section and up to 5 in the secondary section.

Primary Section versus Secondary Sections

When crosslisting one or more course sections one section is designated as the primary section. The primary section should always be the section with the lower course number. For example: If CERA*200*01 is being crosslisted with CERA*300*01, CERA*200*01 would be set as the primary section. If CERA*200*01 is being crosslisted with CERA*200*02, CERA*200*01 would be set as the primary section. 

To identify course sections that are crosslisted & review global capacity

  1. Access the Current and Upcoming Section Data Dashboardlocated on the Refreshable Reports & Dashboards page in the portal.
  2. Scroll down to the section titled Crosslisted Sections.
  3. Confirm section crosslists, including the global capacity. 

Important Considerations

  • 25Live: When entering locations for crosslisted course sections, a location should only be entered for the primary section. Secondary sections will automatically inherit the meeting pattern of the primary section, including the assigned locations.
  • Canvas: Crosslisted course sections share the same class page in Canvas. This is problematic if two unrelated course sections are crosslisted. Contact registrar@uarts.edu for assistance in such cases.

Regular & Substantive Interaction

Regular and substantive interactions represent the frequency and type of educational activities within remote and online classes that allow instructor and students to exchange knowledge, information, concepts, and ideas in a manner that promotes thoughtful learning through active engagement with people, content, and resources. 

All undergraduate and graduate courses offered by the University via online or remote delivery methods, in accordance with Federal Student Aid requirements for distance education courses, require regular and substantive interaction initiated by an instructor that meets accrediting agency standards. Distance education courses qualify for Title IV financial aid, failure to adhere to regular and substantive interaction requirements will result in a course being classified as a correspondence course which is not federal student aid eligible. 

Regular Interaction

Interactions must be recurring at uniform intervals. Instructional materials and faculty support necessary for academic engagement must be available for each week a term is in session.

Substantive Interaction

Interactions which promote active learning and thoughtful reflection and that provide opportunities to expand understanding and knowledge.

Scheduling Rules

The following rules must be observed when planning course section offerings. Compliance is monitored and enforced by the Office of the Registrar

Scheduling Rule Undergraduate Graduate
No classes are to be scheduled on Wednesdays,11:30 AM -12:50 PM. This time is reserved for meetings and special events. ☑️ ☑️
No required first year studio classes or 100 level Critical Studies classes should be scheduled at Wednesday, 4:00-6:50 PM. ☑️  
No studio classes should be scheduled on Thursdays, 4:00 PM - 6:50 PM. This time is reserved for 200-400 level Critical Studies classes. ☑️  

Classes must either:

Start at 8:30 AM, 10:00 AM, 11:30 AM, 1:00 PM, 2:30 PM, 4:00 PM, 5:30 PM, or 7:00 PM;

or

End at 9:50 AM, 11:20 AM, 12:50 PM, 2:20 PM, 3:50 PM, 5:20 PM, or 6:50 PM.
☑️ ☑️
Classes that meet more than once per week must be scheduled at the same time. ☑️  
Classes meeting twice per week must be scheduled on Monday/Thursday or Tuesday/Friday. ☑️  
Classes meeting three times per week must be scheduled on Monday/Wednesday/Thursday or Tuesday/Wednesday/Friday. ☑️