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    The University of the Arts
   
 
  Oct 23, 2017
 
 
    
2008-2009 University Catalogue [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Financial Aid


Click on a link to be taken to the entry below.


 

Chris Pesotski
cpesotski@uarts.edu
Director of Financial Aid
Second Floor, Dorrance Hamilton Hall
215-717-6170

 

The University of the Arts offers a variety of financial aid programs to assist students in meeting their educational goals. Aid may be offered in the form of grants, scholarships, loans, or employment and is funded through federal, state, institutional, or private organizations. Grants and scholarships are considered gift aid and need not be repaid. Loans, which must be repaid, are usually offered at a low interest rate and have an extended repayment period.

Financial need is defined as the difference between the cost of education and the family’s federally calculated contribution to these costs: the Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Where need exists, the University assists in meeting costs within the resources available to the institution.

Nearly 80 percent of the University’s students enrolled on a full-time basis are eligible for some type of need-based aid. All undergraduate and graduate students are encouraged to apply.

Information on application procedures, types of aid, program requirements, educational costs as determined by the University, and the students’ rights and responsibilities is detailed in this section. Most general questions will be answered below. Please contact the Financial Aid Office for assistance with any specific questions you may have.

Undergraduate Eligibility Criteria

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In order to qualify for financial aid an undergraduate student must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen, or eligible non-citizen per federal regulations.
  • Be admitted to the University.
  • Not have received a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent - some forms of aid, however are offered to post-undergraduate students as specifically noted under the section titled “Bachelor’s Degree Holders.”
  • Not have received aid for the maximum number of allowable semesters (eight).
  • Not have defaulted on a previous federal loan.
  • Be matriculated in a program that terminates in a degree or certificate.
  • Be enrolled as a full-time student. (A full-time undergraduate student is one who is registered for at least 12 credits per semester. The University offers some types of financial aid to part-time students. For undergraduates, part time is defined as 6-11.5 credits. Some forms of aid are offered to less than full-time students as specifically noted under “Part-Time Students.”
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined by the University.
  • Apply for financial aid by the indicated deadline using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
  • Demonstrate financial need as determined by the analysis of the (FAFSA).

Graduate Eligibility Criteria

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In order to qualify for financial aid a graduate student must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen, or eligible non-citizen per federal regulations.
  • Be admitted to the University.
  • Not have received a master’s degree or its equivalent –
  • Not have received aid for the maximum number of allowable semesters.
  • Not have defaulted on a previous federal loan.
  • Be matriculated in a program that terminates in a degree
  • Be enrolled as a full-time student. A full-time graduate student must be enrolled for at least 9 credits per semester. The University offers some types of financial aid to part-time students. For graduate students, part time is defined as 4.5-8.5 credits. Some forms of aid are offered to less than full-time students as specifically noted under “Part-Time Students.”
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined by the University.
  • Apply for financial aid by the indicated deadline using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
  • Demonstrate financial need as determined by the analysis of the (FAFSA).

Applying for Financial Aid

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Deadlines

Deadlines are necessary to ensure that all students have an equal opportunity to be considered for financial aid given the fact that the University must determine how to distribute available funds to the many students who wish to be considered for aid before those funds can be allocated. Deadlines are also in place to ensure that the University will receive and communicate the necessary information in time to allow the students to make informed decisions regarding their enrollment and related financial plans.

Students who miss the filing deadlines may receive less financial aid than students who apply on time. Late applicants may not be able to register for or attend classes if their late application results in outstanding balances.

All eligible students are considered for financial assistance regardless of filing date, depending upon availability of funds. However, University-administered funds will not be used to replace federal or state grants or loans for which a student may have been eligible but for which he/she failed to apply successfully.

New Students

The University of the Arts’ postmark deadline for submission of the FAFSA is March 1.

All students who plan to attend the University during the Fall or Spring semesters must file the FAFSA by the above deadline. Incoming students are considered on a rolling, funds-available basis after the March 1 deadline. Applicants are advised to submit all application materials by March 1 or as soon as possible. Some sources of funding (as above) are limited and will not be available to otherwise eligible but late applicants.

Currently Enrolled Students

The University of the Arts’ postmark deadline for submission of the FAFSA is March 15.

As noted above, all students who plan to attend the University during the Fall or Spring semesters must file the FAFSA by the March 15. Incomplete applications and applications submitted after March 15 will be considered only after on-time applications have been awarded. Some types of aid (University Grants, Scholarships, SEOG Grants, Perkins Loans, Federal Work Study, and PHEAA Grants) are awarded on an on-time basis and may not be available to otherwise eligible but late applicants.


Pennsylvania Undergraduate Students
 

PHEAA (Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency) State Grant Deadline

PHEAA’s deadline for receipt of the completed FAFSA application is May 1 for the following year. Applications received after that date may render a student ineligible for PHEAA Grants as well as the other types of aid specified above.


Duration of Eligibility

Students are not permitted to delay graduation once degree requirements have been met in pursuit of additional coursework or to continue their eligibility for financial aid.

Students can exhaust their eligibility for financial aid by failing or withdrawing from courses due to the impact of such actions on adequate progress towards completion of the degree, or the student’s GPA. Students are strongly encouraged to work with their academic advisor to plan a program that will encourage their continued academic success in a timely manner and to contact the Financial Aid Office with any questions regarding their status.

Undergraduate Students
Under federal and University guidelines, undergraduate students may continue to receive financial aid for only eight semesters, or until the first baccalaureate degree or its equivalent has been earned.

Students may not receive undergraduate grants to complete minors, double degrees, or teacher certification programs that extend beyond eight semesters if the other requirements for the completion of the undergraduate degree have been met.

Graduate Students
Under federal and University guidelines, graduate students may continue to receive financial aid for only the published length of the program as listed in this catalog, or until the first master’s degree or its equivalent has been earned.

 

Financial Aid Application Procedure

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All students who wish to be considered for financial aid must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The information must be released to the U.S. Department of Education and to the University.

A student cannot be considered for any type of financial aid until a correct and complete FAFSA has been processed.

The University does not require the CSS, ACT, FAF, Profile, or other financial aid applications to be considered for financial assistance.

The Department of Education has provided an easy way to apply electronically for aid. The FAFSA can be completed and filed at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov.


School Code

The University of the Arts Federal Title IV code is 003350.

Please note:
To be considered for financial aid, students must be accepted for admission to the University or be currently enrolled and making satisfactory academic progress as defined by the University.


Declining Financial Aid

If a student declines his/her offer of financial aid or admission, the University will rescind all offers of financial assistance (scholarships, grants, loans, and work study). If that student decides later in that year to enroll at the University for the upcoming academic year, he/she will be reconsidered for assistance at that point. Eligibility for financial assistance will be effected by the timing of the students decision to enroll, and availability of funds at the time when the student communicates their decision to enroll.

If the student decides to seek financial aid for a subsequent academic year, the student must re-apply for financial aid by completing a new FAFSA in accordance with the published deadlines and processes in place at that time.

A student may choose to decline a portion of his/her financial aid award by sending a letter to the Office of Financial Aid noting the type and amount of aid the student is declining.

State Grant Information

The FAFSA serves as the state grant application for residents of Pennsylvania (per PHEAA’s guidelines), and will be used to evaluate the student’s eligibility for a PHEAA Grant. The PHEAA deadline for filing of the FAFSA is May 1. Residents of Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Massachusetts, Ohio, Rhode Island, Vermont, or West Virginia, may be eligible to receive a state grant at UArts and should contact the higher education assistance agency in their state of residence for deadline information.

Students who are residents of these states and are currently receiving a state grant MUST file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). A separate state grant application form may also need to be submitted to the higher education assistance agency in the student’s home state.

If the state grant can be used in Pennsylvania, it is “portable.” Portable state grants may be less at UArts than if used at a college in a student’s home state.

Residents of states not listed above are prevented by their state from using their state grants in Pennsylvania.


Verification

The federal government randomly selects FAFSA applicants for a process called Verification. Students may also be flagged for verification if unusual or conflicting information is reported on the FAFSA.

The purpose of verification is to find and correct common mistakes made during the filing of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). A student whose application is under verification must provide the necessary information to complete the verification process before need-based aid financial aid can be awarded. If the verification process is not completed, a student will not be considered for any need-based financial aid. Thus, it is important to return the information and requested documentation as soon as possible.


Frequently Asked Questions About Verification:

  • Why was I selected for verification? - The federal government randomly selects FAFSA applicants for verification. Students may also be flagged for verification if conflicting or confusing information is reported on the FAFSA.
  • When will I be notified if I am selected for verification? - You will be notified of your selection for verification approximately 7-10 days after your FAFSA results have been received by UArts. (The result of your FAFSA is referred to as a Student Aid Report (SAR)).
  • What will I need to provide if I am selected for verification? - If your application is selected for further review, you will be asked to submit signed statements confirming information you reported when completing the FAFSA. The Office of Financial Aid will send a letter requesting the needed documentation. Examples of documentation include copy of tax forms and the verification worksheets.

Types of Aid

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Each student who completes a FAFSA will be considered for all of the following types of aid. Parental higher education enrollment cannot be considered when eligibility for aid is calculated.


Institutional Scholarships and Grants

University Scholarships

University Scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic excellence and demonstrated talent. The Presidential, Promising Artist, and Artist Grant are types of University Scholarships.

University Scholarships are awarded when students are admitted.

To assist students and their families with financial planning for their enrollment, scholarship amounts are fixed and renewable so long as the student makes satisfactory academic progress.

Named/Endowed Scholarships

The University offers a number of scholarships that have been donated by individuals, families or groups to help support promising artists. These named scholarships are awarded based on specific criteria, which may include need and/or merit .

University Grant

University Grants are generally need-based and are awarded by the Financial Aid Office to supplement all other financial aid assistance.
Undergraduate students must be enrolled for at least twelve credits in order to receive Institutional Aid that is merit or need-based. Graduate Students must be enrolled for at least nine credits to be considered for such assistance.


Federal/State Grants

Pell Grant

The Pell Grant is a federally funded program that awards individual grants in amounts ranging from $890 to $4731 to students who have not received a bachelor’s degree, nor been aided for the maximum number of semesters allowed and meet all other eligibility criteria.

Eligibility is determined by the federal government and notification is sent directly to the student in the form of a Student Aid Report (SAR). The student should expect to receive the SAR approximately four weeks after the FAFSA has been filed. The SAR should be reviewed for accuracy and corrected if necessary. A copy of the correct /ed SAR should be retained by the student as confirmation of receipt of the FAFSA. Students must enroll for at least three credits in order to be eligible for the Pell Grant.

PHEAA Grant

Awards are made to Pennsylvania residents who are seeking a first bachelor’s degree and who have not yet completed the maximum number of semesters allowed (eight).

Eligible students must demonstrate sufficient financial need as determined by PHEAA, Pennsylvania residency, and be enrolled for at least twelve credits. To continue to be eligible for state grant assistance, a full-time student must complete a minimum of 24 credits per academic year.
An award letter may indicate an estimated state grant amount; however, eligibility is determined by the state and official notification is sent directly to the student beginning in May.

NOTE: Students must meet state residency requirements in accordance with PHEAA guidelines. PHEAA’s filing deadline is May 1.
Other states have scholarship programs for their residents. Information and applications are available from the respective states.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

FSEOG is a federally funded University-administered program. These grants are awarded to students who demonstrate significant financial need and are seeking a first bachelor’s degree, and who have not yet completed the maximum number of semesters allowed (eight). Typically, FSEOG grants are first awarded to Pell Grant recipients who have met the filing deadlines on a funds-available basis.

Outside Scholarships

The University encourages students to explore all options for outside scholarship assistance. Local businesses, foundations, churches, unions, civic organizations, etc., often sponsor scholarships that can be used toward educational costs.

A good place to begin the search for outside scholarships is online at www.fastweb.com. This is a free scholarship search service. The University of the Arts advises students NEVER to pay for financial aid information or for scholarship searches.

Students who receive outside awards or scholarships are required by federal regulation to notify the Office of Financial Aid. In some cases, outside scholarships may cause the revision or reduction of other types of aid.

 

Student Loan Programs

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Federal Student loans are available to assist students in meeting both tuition and living expenses, with low interest rates, and extended repayment terms. Because loan indebtedness has serious implications, students should carefully consider the amount of their borrowing (both yearly and cumulative) and borrow the minimum necessary to reasonably meet those expenses that remain above the Financial Aid Award.

All students, regardless of state of residency, may borrow from a Pennsylvania bank and are urged to do so. New students should visit the UArts Financial Aid website for instructions to complete a Master Promissory Note (MPN). Students who have previously received a Stafford using an MPN are not required to file another MPN for 10 years.

If the student has previously borrowed under any of the student loan programs, he or she is encouraged to use the same bank to avoid having multiple loan payments upon graduation.

All loan applications are based on the FAFSA application; thus this application must be completed before the loan application is considered. While the loan application is an element of the Financial Aid application process, it is also a separate transaction between the student and his or her bank. It is critical that the student understand that it is he or she alone who is responsible for repaying funds borrowed, and that for most students this will be the most serious long-term financial obligation yet undertaken.

All first-time borrowers are required to complete an Entrance Interview according to the lender’s instructions before the University is permitted release loan funds. This may be coordinated with the student’s lender.

Federal Stafford Student Loan (Stafford)

A Stafford loan cannot be approved until a complete FAFSA has been processed.

Students wishing to use proceeds from the Stafford loan must submit a complete application by March 15. Students can apply for the Stafford Loan electronically at http://www.aessuccess.org.

Under federal regulations, only one Stafford loan may be processed for each student each year.


Undergraduate Students

Undergraduate students are required to register for at least six credits each semester in order to receive funding from the Stafford program. Stafford loan eligibility is determined based upon the number of credits the undergraduate student has completed, according to the following schedule:

0 – 29.99 credits Freshman maximum $3,500 plus $2000 in unsubsidized eligibility
30 – 59.99 credits Sophomore maximum $4,500 plus $2000 in unsubsidized eligibility
60 – 89.99 credits Junior maximum $5,500 plus $2000 in unsubsidized eligibility
90 + credits Senior maximum $5,500 plus $2000 in unsubsidized eligibility

The above loan amounts may be subsidized or unsubsidized depending upon the student’s financial eligibility. If the loan is subsidized the student is not responsible for making any interest or principal payments during enrollment. If the loan is unsubsidized the student is responsible for making interest payments during enrollment.

Undergraduate students who are independent and dependent students whose parents cannot qualify for the PLUS loan are eligible for the following additional amounts under the Unsubsidized Stafford Program:

0 – 29.99 credits Freshman maximum $4,000
30 – 59.99 credits Sophomore maximum $4,000
60 – 89.99 credits Junior maximum $5,000
90 + credits Senior maximum $5,000

Most Stafford loans will be disbursed to the University electronically and will not require the student’s signature.

If a student loan is disbursed by check, it cannot be credited to the student’s account until he/she signs the check. (Stafford loan checks will be available in the Finance Office for signature; PLUS checks will be mailed to the parent borrower.)


Graduate Students

Graduate students are required to register for at least 4.5 credits each semester in order to receive funding from the Stafford Loan program.


Subsidized Stafford Loan

  • Subsidized Stafford Loan Eligibility up to $ 8,500 plus $2000 in unsubsidized eligibility
  • Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Eligibility up to $12,000

Total graduate maximum Stafford eligibility per academic year $20,500


Parent Plus Loan For Undergraduate Students (PLUS)

The federally-sponsored Parent PLUS loan is a low interest student loan for parents of undergraduate, dependent students. With a Parent PLUS loan, families can fund the entire cost of a child’s education (less other financial aid).

The parent of a dependent student may borrow up to the cost of education (which includes living expenses) minus any other financial aid the student is scheduled to receive. Repayment begins 60 days after loan funds have been disbursed. The PLUS loan interest rate is fixed. Approval for the PLUS loan is based upon credit history.

Typically the loan application process requires six to eight weeks. In order to deduct the anticipated proceeds from a PLUS loan from the invoice, the loan must have been approved. The PLUS loan cannot be certified until a complete FAFSA has been processed.
 

Graduate PLUS

The Federal Graduate PLUS loan is a student loan for graduate and professional students who need additional funds to meet educational costs. Graduate students should utilize Stafford loans before Graduate PLUS to take advantage of lower interest rates. The interest rate is fixed. An Entrance Interview is required.
 

Private Education Loans

Private education loans are privately funded loans which may be used to supplement students’ federal and University-based aid. When combined with all other forms of aid, alternative loans may not exceed the University’s cost of attendance. Approval for these loans is credit-based; the University encourages students to apply with credit-worthy co-borrowers whenever possible.


NJ CLASS Loan

If a undergraduate student’s parent is a New Jersey resident, he/she may be interested in the NJ CLASS loan, which may allow payments to be deferred while the student is enrolled. For information and application forms call 1-800-792-8670 or visit http://www.hesaa.org.


Federal Perkins Loan

Perkins is a need-based federal loan program awarded by the University. The Federal Perkins Loan is currently offered at a fixed five percent interest rate and is repayable to the University over a maximum 10-year period. Repayment begins nine months after graduation or cessation of at least half-time enrollment at an eligible institution in an approved program of study.

Because Perkins loan funds are limited, this loan is offered to the earliest applicants whose Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is lowest. Perkins loans are usually awarded to Freshman and Sophomore students (Junior and Senior students have greater eligibility for Stafford loans). Notification of eligibility for this loan is included in the award letter.

To claim these funds the student must endorse a Perkins promissory note in the University’s Student Billing Office. Funds cannot be credited until a complete, correct note is negotiated.


Disbursement Amounts

The lender may deduct origination and insurance fees from Stafford, PLUS, and other alternative loans before they are disbursed. These fees can total up to four percent (or more for some alternative loans) of the principal amount; thus, the amount available from the loan to pay educational costs may be less than the amount borrowed.

Student Employment

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Federal Work Study (FWS)

FWS is a federally funded program administered by the University. Eligibility for this program is based upon the availability of funds to the University and the student’s EFC.

The Financial Aid Office will make a determination of the student’s eligibility to earn money through the FWS Program. Notification of eligibility will be included in the Award letter.

An FWS award is not an offer or a guarantee of a job; it is the amount a student is eligible to earn should she or he secure a job. Work study awards are not applied against the invoice. Payment is made directly to employed students by a University payroll check.

Eligible students are permitted to work up to 20 hours weekly when classes are in session. Students are paid at least minimum wage, and hours may be arranged to accommodate the class schedule. The FWS award can be used between July 1, 2008, and June 30, 2009.

Jobs are usually available throughout the University in academic departments, Public Safety, University offices, the University Libraries etc. Positions require various levels of skill and experience. Additional positions with approved off-campus, non-profit organizations provide students the opportunity to be employed in community service positions and receive payment through the FWS program.


Non-Federal Work Study (NFWS)

Students who do not qualify to work under the Federal Work Study program may work on campus under the NFWS program.

Information about job availability and placement is as listed in the Federal Work Study section.


General Information About Student Employment

The Student Employment Handbook contains expanded information about FWS and NFWS, job openings, and additional information for fall placement. The handbook is available on the UArts portal in late summer.

Students are reminded that falsifying time cards is a criminal offense, which can subject them to criminal prosecution, disciplinary action, expulsion, and/or loss of all financial aid.

 

Award Notification

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Award letters will be sent to new students beginning in February and to returning students beginning in May. The Financial Aid Office staff will be available to counsel students at any point during the application process. Students should be aware that some aid is conditional on the availability of funds to the University, and if these funds are reduced, the University may reduce aid accordingly.


If an award is estimated, that means some additional steps must be taken by the student before the student can receive those funds, such as completing verification, an entrance interview, or other required documents.


Additional steps are required to claim these forms of financial aid:

Federal Work Study

In order to claim a FWS award the student must locate an eligible job. Once hired, the student must come to the Financial Aid Office to complete the necessary payroll paperwork. Students cannot work, nor can they be paid, until this paperwork is submitted and proper identification is documented. FWS cannot be deducted from the tuition invoice.
 

Pell Grant

Approximately four weeks after the FAFSA is filed, the student will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR). This document will notify a student as to Pell Grant eligibility. All of the information on the SAR must be correct and complete.

The award letter will list the Pell Grant amount. Changes to the FAFSA information may affect the student’s Pell Grant eligibility.
 

Perkins Loan

To claim these funds the student must endorse a Perkins promissory note in the Student Billing Office. Funds cannot be credited until a complete, correct note is negotiated.


PLUS and Stafford Loans

These loans must be applied for through the student’s lender. Proceeds from these loans are disbursed to the University. Most Stafford loans will be disbursed to the University electronically and will not require the student’s signature. If a student loan is disbursed by check, it cannot be credited to his/her account until he/she signs the check. (Stafford loan checks will be available in the Student Billing Office for signature; PLUS checks will be mailed to the parent borrower.)


The award notice is subject to revision under the following circumstances:

  1. If government funding levels to the University are reduced, individual awards will be adjusted accordingly.
  2. Verification - The Financial Aid Office is required by federal regulation to resolve any discrepancies in information submitted per verification with that already in a student’s file. Once the discrepancies are resolved, the student’s aid amounts and/or types may be revised based on the changes.
  3. As above, if at any point in the year The University becomes aware of information that conflicts with other documentation in the student’s file, we will resolve the discrepancy and revise the award accordingly.
  4. Outside Scholarships - Per federal regulation, a student is not permitted to be “over awarded.” That is, a student’s total amount of scholarships, grants, loans, and work study may not exceed the student’s calculated need. If a student would be over awarded due to an outside scholarship, we are required to adjust the other elements of the aid package to eliminate the over award. We encourage students to seek outside scholarships, and will adjust institutional aid only if absolutely necessary.
  5. The University may substitute other aid funds of equal amount and type at any point in the year at its discretion and without any notice.
  6. If the student changes enrollment status.
  7. If the University is required to adjust the student’s award for any other reason.

 

Special Circumstances and Appeals for Additional Aid

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Changes in a student’s family or academic circumstances may necessitate a review of the estimated family contribution and related financial aid award. Such reviews are conducted in response to a written request for an Appeal from the student, in which the change in circumstances is described in detail, and submitted for consideration to the Office of Financial Aid.

Income Reduction

The FAFSA collects information about a family’s income and assets from the previous year (2007). For most people this information is a good predictor of the current year’s (2008) income, since most people do not experience wide swings in income from year to year.

If, however, a family’s income in the current year will be significantly different (more than 10 percent) from last year’s, the family should notify the Financial Aid Office in writing, including all available documentation. Reductions in income that are caused by involuntary job loss, unusually high unreimbursed medical expenses, separation, divorce, death of a wage earner, or the like will be considered.

If a family’s circumstances meet these criteria, the University will calculate the financial aid award based upon the estimated current year (2008) figures for the Fall semester. At the end of the Fall semester the family will be required to provide documentation (such as final pay stub or an estimated 2008 return) for evaluation of the spring semester’s award.

Unfortunately, the University is not generally able to consider reductions in income due to voluntary job changes, back taxes owed, high consumer debt, multiple mortgages, employment bonuses received in the previous year, overtime, self-employment losses, fluctuations in income from commission sales, or discretionary purchases.

Divorce or Separation

When a married student or an enrolled student’s parent/guardian separates from or divorces his/her spouse subsequent to the filing of the financial aid application, the divorcing/separating student or custodial parent/guardian of the enrolled student should notify the Financial Aid Office in writing.
In the case of a separation or divorce involving the parents/guardians of a student, the Financial Aid Office is permitted to discuss the student’s record only with the custodial parent.

Death

Sadly, the University occasionally is called upon to assist a student whose parent or spouse has died subsequent to the filing of the financial aid application. Should this occur, the Financial Aid Office should be contacted immediately, and it will offer every assistance possible.

Dependency Override

The Financial Aid Office is occasionally asked to re-evaluate a student’s status due to the student’s assertion that he or she should be considered independent of parental support.

The guidelines for dependency are set by federal law, and thus each student must first be evaluated against them. A dependent student is someone who is younger than 24, is not a veteran, is not a graduate or professional student, is not married, is not an orphan or ward of the court, or does not have legal dependents.

An independent student is someone who is older than 24, a veteran, currently serving on active military duty, a graduate or professional student, married, or has legal dependents. (See the FAFSA.)

Federal and institutional policy is that the first responsibility for college costs is the student’s and his/her family’s; thus appeals are rarely granted.
A student who wishes to be considered independent must write a letter of appeal to the Financial Aid Office. The letter must clearly state the reasons for appealing the dependency status. The student will be required to document his/her means of support as well as other items. Please contact the Financial Aid Office for additional information.

Other Appeals

The Financial Aid Office cannot consider proposals for a recalculation of financial aid eligibility based on any circumstances other than those listed above.

 

Satisfactory Academic Progress

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Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Student Financial Assistance

Students receiving financial assistance are required by federal regulation to be making Satisfactory Academic Progress in order to continue to receive financial assistance while enrolled at The University of The Arts.

Federal regulations require that an institution establish, publish, and apply reasonable standards for measuring whether a student, who is otherwise eligible for assistance, is maintaining satisfactory academic progress in his or her program of study. The standards must be the same or stricter than the institution’s standards for a student enrolled in the same academic program who is not receiving financial assistance. Listed below is the complete statement of Minimum Standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress for financial assistance recipients.

This policy is separate from The University of The Arts Merit Aid Terms and Conditions and from any policies that individual colleges or programs may have.

Minimum Standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Assistance

Students must complete at least 24 credits per year when full time, or a pro-rated number of credits when enrolled for a portion of the year as calculated below under Quantitative Standards.

Students must complete 66.67percent of all credits they are registered for on the last day of the drop/add period as calculated below under Quantitative Standards.

Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 as calculated below under Qualitative Standards.

Students may submit an appeal to the Office of Financial Aid if they fail to meet the University’s Satisfactory Academic Progress policy for Student Financial Assistance.
 

Maximum Timeframes for Completing Degree Requirements

  • Students are expected to complete their program of study (degree, certificate or diploma) in the number of semesters indicated in this catalog. Transfer students and students changing programs are placed by their academic chair/director in an appropriate semester on the basis of the number and type of credits transferred. Such students are expected to complete their degree according to the remaining semesters in their program plus one additional semester to allow for scheduling difficulties. Students are strongly advised to review their degree audit and program requirements with their advisor to ensure that their remaining requirements and graduation plan are understood.
  • The maximum time allotted for completion of the Baccalaureate degree requirements is six years for full-time students and twelve years for part-time students. Transfer credits earned at other institutions that are applicable to the student’s program of study will be considered in determining the student’s maximum timeframe for program.
  • The maximum timeframe for completing graduate degree requirements is three years for full-time students and six years for part-time students.
  • The maximum timeframe for completing certificate or diploma requirements is three years for full-time students and six years for part-time students.
  • University-based financial assistance is only available for eight semesters for undergraduate students and four semesters for graduate, certificate or diploma students.

Students must make quantitative and qualitative progress toward their educational goals each academic year to receive assistance. The academic year consists of two regular semesters and the summer sessions.

 

Quantitative Standards

  • Undergraduate students must successfully complete a minimum of 66.67 percent of all credits attempted to be making satisfactory progress and maintain financial aid eligibility.
  • Full-time undergraduate students must successfully complete a minimum of 24 credit hours each academic year. Students admitted in January must successfully complete a minimum of 12 credits during their first Spring semester. Please note that undergraduate students without transfer credits, who only complete 12 credits a semester, will not be able to complete their degree requirements within the eight semesters allotted for financial assistance. Such students will not only lose University-based assistance after eight semesters, but will also incur substantial out-of-pocket costs for all remaining semesters. The same policy and caution applies to transfer students, although the number of semesters is prorated in accordance with the transfer credits awarded. Students are strongly advised to follow the degree plan published in the catalog and established by their advisor.
  • Undergraduate students enrolled on a three-quarter-time basis (9-11 credits per semester) must successfully complete a minimum of 18 credit hours each academic year.
  • Undergraduate students enrolled on a half-time basis (6-8 credits per semester) must successfully complete a minimum of 12 credit hours each academic year.
  • Undergraduate students enrolled on a less than half-time basis (less than 6 credits per semester) must successfully complete all credit hours they attempt each academic year.
  • Graduate students must complete 75 percent of all credits attempted in an academic year.

Although 12 credits is the minimum per-semester credit accumulation to maintain eligibility for financial assistance, a student completing only this minimum WILL NOT be on track to graduate in four years at this rate. In addition, “D” grades will cause a student to fail the qualitative (GPA) progress standard.


Qualitative Standards

  • Undergraduate students must maintain a Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.0 calculated at the end of the academic year in order to be considered a student in good standing.
  • Post-baccalaureate and graduate students must maintain a Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.0 calculated at the end of the academic year in order to be considered a student in good standing.
  • Required classes that are repeated as a result of a failed or inadequate grade will only be counted once towards the calculation of credits completed, while all attempts will be included in the calculation of “credits attempted.”
  • The highest grade of any classes repeated will be counted in the GPA calculation
  • Other Standards.

The maximum number of remedial credits for which a student may receive financial aid is one year’s worth of noncredit remedial course work. The University of the Arts has established 12 credits as one year’s worth of noncredit remedial course work. The need for remedial coursework does not increase the maximum numbers of University assistance available to a student.

If the student is dismissed or suspended from The University, a College, or a program for any reason, the student is automatically ineligible for financial assistance.

Students may petition to the Office of Financial Aid re-establish their eligibility for assistance, which may be granted on a permanent or probationary status.


Measurement of Academic Progress Requirements

Academic progress will be measured in May of each year. Measurement begins with the Fall semester and ends with the last summer session. Students who were enrolled during the Fall and/or Spring semesters and failed to meet the qualitative and/or quantitative requirements for academic progress can attempt to complete additional credits and bring up their GPA during the summer sessions. Please note that only those credits earned at The University of The Arts will affect the GPA. Credits taken at another college or university post to the UArts transcript as transfer credits only (no grades are posted), and will only affect the number of total credits earned, not the semester or cumulative GPA. Upon completion of the additional credits, a new determination of academic progress will be made.

Transfer students are evaluated for academic progress in May, after the first Spring semester attended at The University of The Arts.
Students who transfer to the University for the spring semester, and are required to take summer Foundation classes in the Summer semester, are evaluated for adequate progress towards degree after the end of the summer Foundation semester.

Students enrolled in the low-residency MFA program must complete their coursework exactly as described in the University’s course catalog.
All students seeking financial assistance are subject to the Satisfactory Academic Standards regardless of whether or not they received financial assistance previously.

Failures and withdrawals are counted as courses attempted, not completed. Incompletes are not counted toward credits completed until after the course work is successfully completed and grades are posted by the Registrar. Required classes that are repeated as a result of a failed or inadequate grade will only be counted once towards the calculation of credits completed, while all attempts will be included in the calculation of “credits attempted.”


When Minimum Standards of Academic Progress Are Not Achieved – Appeals for Reinstatement of Financial Assistance

A student who does not make satisfactory academic progress will be placed on Financial Assistance Suspension until the requirements for satisfactory academic progress are met. The student will be notified in writing of the financial assistance suspension. In such cases, the student can appeal the decision to the Office of Financial Aid. The appeal must be submitted in writing within two weeks of being placed on financial assistance. suspension and contain the following:

  • A specific explanation of the extenuating circumstances which prevented the student from achieving satisfactory academic progress including exact dates and details as appropriate.
  • A success plan for the future that addresses the prior issues that prevented academic success and describes the changes that will be made by the student to ensure future success.
  • At least one letter of academic support from an instructor that the student has had while at The University of the Arts, and/or the student’s academic advisor.
  • Any appropriate documentation (medical records, death certificate, etc.)

The following types of mitigating circumstances may be considered when a student appeals: extended illness, recent diagnosis of documented learning disability, death in the family, and changes in educational objective. The Office of Financial Aid may request additional documentation and/or require a personal interview with the student. After the review, The Office of Financial Aid will notify the student in writing of the action taken.

If The Office of Financial Aid determines that the Academic Progress Standards can be waived for one semester, the student will be placed on Financial Assistance Probation. At the end of the probationary semester if academic requirements have been met, the probationary status will be removed. If academic requirements have not been met, the student will be placed on Financial Assistance Suspension.

Once financial assistance has been discontinued, it will be reinstated provided:

  • The student has successfully achieved the required number of credits and grade point average;
  • The student has requested reinstatement in writing; and
  • Funds are still available.

Reinstatement is not automatic. The student is responsible for making certain that the grades and credits completed have been properly posted with the Registrar prior to requesting reinstatement of financial assistance. Students are encouraged to file all financial assistance application forms by The University of The Arts’ established deadline so that once reinstatement has been granted, he or she can be considered for assistance as quickly as possible.

A student who is denied assistance based on qualitative or quantitative standards will be considered for assistance when standards have been met. No aid may be awarded retroactively to the semester(s) in which standards were not met.

PHEAA State Grant Appeals

The University has no authority to make exceptions to PHEAA state grant policies. Students wishing to appeal the loss of state grants must write a letter of appeal to PHEAA. Appeal letters must include documentation of those significant events (major illness, severe injury, or family upheaval such as divorce or death) that impacted the student’s academic performance. Students wishing to appeal the loss of state grant eligibility are urged to do so as soon as such information is known, as the state requires several weeks (typically 8-10) to respond to appeals.


Terms and Conditions for Merit-Based Assistance

A merit-based scholarship, grant or award, including Presidential, Director’s, Promising Artist, Artist Grant, and Named/Endowed Scholarships or Awards will be renewed under the following terms and conditions:

  1. The student must enroll as a full-time undergraduate at the University. Full time is defined as completing between 12 and 18 credits each semester. Students who complete fewer than 12 credits each semester may have their scholarship/grant revoked. The award will not be granted for more than eight semesters. The student must maintain satisfactory academic progress in accordance with University regulations.
  2. The scholarship/grant will be revoked should the student withdraw from the University. The University reserves the right to terminate this scholarship/grant if the student’s enrollment is not continuous from the date of original entry. Students who take an approved leave of absence of no longer than two semesters will be eligible for scholarships/grants upon their return to the University.
  3. Should the student be subject to disciplinary dismissal, academic probation or dismissal while enrolled at the University the scholarship/grant will be revoked.
  4. The University reserves the right to reduce this scholarship/grant to eliminate any cash refund should the scholarship/grant when combined with other financial aid, outside scholarships, or benefits exceed tuition or the cost of attendance.
  5. The Award is a tuition scholarship, which cannot be combined with other University sponsored grants, scholarships, or benefits, (which include but are not limited to tuition remission, tuition exchange, or tuition discounts), to be used toward dormitory fees, or other non-tuition expenses.
  6. PHEAA and/or other state grant recipients are subject to specific gift aid tests and may not receive grants and scholarships exceeding tuition, fees, and an allowance for books and supplies.
  7. Should the student decline this scholarship/grant, the offer becomes void and is canceled. If the scholarship/grant is canceled, the student may reapply, but will be considered on a funds available basis may not be awarded the same amount.
  8. The scholarship/grant cannot be combined with tuition remission, the Legacy or Family Scholarship, alumni discount or the sibling discount. A sibling of a scholarship/grant recipient will, however, qualify for the sibling discount or Legacy or Family Scholarship.
  9. Scholarship/grant recipients are required to maintain a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA. The University reserves the right to revoke the scholarship/grant in full or in part should the recipient’s cumulative GPA fall below 2.0.

 

 Change in Enrollment Status: Undergraduate Students

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Unless specifically designated otherwise, all awards are issued based upon the student’s anticipated enrollment as a full-time undergraduate (completing 12 credits or more per semester, in a degree-granting program). Students who become less than full time or who enroll as “non-degree” may lose their eligibility for aid in full or in part.

The Financial Aid Office periodically reviews all student accounts and immediately removes any aid credited to the account of a student who has failed to satisfy progress or enrollment requirements as stated above.

Students who are considering withdrawing (either from the University or from individual classes) are urged to meet with a financial aid counselor to discuss the impact of the withdrawal on their eligibility for aid. Please read the information about refunds in the “Tuition and Expenses” section of this Catalog.

Students are reminded that withdrawing from their courses (either in full or in part) may cause them to lose their eligibility for aid in current and future semesters.

To avoid unexpected balances, students must contact the Financial Aid Office with any questions pertaining to this subject.

 

Graduate Students

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Graduate students are eligible to apply for Stafford and Grad PLUS loans and should refer to the section on student loans for further information. Graduate students may also be eligible for assistantships or fellowships through the department in which they are enrolled. Contact the departmental office for additional information and application instructions.

Graduate students are required to maintain satisfactory academic progress in order to continue to receive financial aid as specified in this catalog.

Students who have attained a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent are not eligible to receive Pell, PHEAA, FSEOG, FWS, Perkins, and most other forms of financial aid including institutional grants.

Graduate students who are in default on a federal student loan are not eligible to receive assistance of any type while enrolled at the University.

Low-Residency MFA Students

Students who enroll at least half-time (4.5 credits) in the Low-residency MFA program may borrow under the Stafford Loan and Grad PLUS programs.

Students who matriculated as of June 2000 and follow the 12, 4.5, 4.5 credit pattern are permitted to borrow during all semesters of enrollments and qualify for deferments; these students may borrow up to $20,500

Students who matriculated prior to June 2000 and follow the 10, 3, 3 credit pattern are not permitted to borrow during the Fall and Spring semesters. Summer MFA students who are enrolled less than half-time are not permitted to borrow and do not qualify for deferments.

 

Transfer Students

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Undergraduate transfer students are eligible for aid and should apply following the same application procedures as other undergraduates (with exceptions listed below).

Transfer students who have borrowed the undergraduate maximum under the Stafford Loan program are not eligible for continued Stafford assistance while enrolled at the University.

Any transfer student who is in default on a federal loan or otherwise ineligible for federal aid, is ineligible for financial aid of any type while enrolled at the University.

Transfer students who enroll for the Spring semester should be aware that financial aid received for enrollment during the Fall semester at another institution is not transferable. Students must reapply for most forms of aid at the University. Contact the Financial Aid Office for additional information and instructions.

 

Bachelor’s Degree Holders

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Students who have earned a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent and who enroll as undergraduates are eligible to apply for Stafford loans, unless they have previously borrowed the undergraduate maximum under the Stafford Loan program. In some cases these students may also be eligible for University-sponsored aid. Students are not eligible to receive Pell Grants, PHEAA Grants, FSEOG, and Perkins Loans.

 

Part-Time Students

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Part-time students who are enrolled in degree programs may be eligible for Pell, University, and PHEAA grants, as well as Stafford loans.

Part-time students are subject to all requirements governing the financial aid programs, except that they be enrolled on a full-time basis.

Part-time students are not eligible for merit-based aid.

Part-time students should follow application procedures as detailed in this catalog.

 

Continuing Education Students

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Students who enroll through the Continuing Education program are eligible for a very limited selection of loan programs. Continuing Education students are not eligible for any other type of financial aid. Contact the Financial Aid Office for additional information.

 

International Students

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Students who are neither U.S. citizens, nor eligible non-citizens (as confirmed by the federal government), are not eligible to receive any form of Federal Title IV financial aid while enrolled at The University of the Arts.

International students will be reviewed for scholarships when offered admission to the University. Those students who demonstrate exceptional academic and artistic ability will be considered for the University’s Scholarship Program.

International students may be eligible to borrow money through a very limited selection of loan programs. International students must have a U.S. citizen serve as the co-signer on the loan. Contact the Financial Aid Office for additional information.

 

Study Abroad and Off-Campus Study

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Study abroad, domestic mobility, and exchange opportunities are available through programs hosted or coordinated through regionally accredited U.S. institutions or through direct application to a foreign institution. The selection of a program should be made carefully, as it may have implications for financial aid, transferability of credits, progress in the major and the completion of degree requirements.

Students who have submitted an approved Petition for Off-Campus Study remain active degree candidates at UArts. Please note that in cases where the student prefers to register and pay tuition at the overseas host institution the student must request a Leave of Absence or withdraw from UArts. In most cases, it will be to the student’s advantage to remain an active UArts student through the Off-Campus Study process; the student can thus register and pay tuition at UArts.

Below is an outline of the three different options available to students who wish to study off-campus. For more complete information, please refer to the full policy on Study Abroad at the following: Study Abroad Policy 

Off-campus Study Through an Exchange, Mobility or Affiliated Study-Abroad, or Domestic Off-campus Study Program

Note: This option is recommended for students who wish to study at an affiliated institution whose tuition is similar to or higher than the tuition charged by UArts.

  • Student registers for a minimum of 12 credits off campus study.
  • Students who normally receive Financial Aid remain eligible for federal, state, institutional and merit-based aid while engaged in off-campus study and upon their return to UArts, presuming that the student continues to meet the academic requirements of their aid package. Please note that some named institutional scholarships may not be applied toward off-campus study.
  • The student will be billed for tuition and fees by UArts. UArts will then pay the student’s tuition at the institution where student will study. Students will not be billed or refunded for any differences in the two schools’ tuitions.

Attending an Unaffiliated Foreign or Domestic Institution

While Registered for Off-Campus Study

Note: This option is recommended for students who wish to study at an unaffiliated institution whose tuition is similar to or higher than the tuition charged by UArts.

  • Student registers for a minimum of 12 credits off campus study.
  • Students who normally receive Financial Aid remain eligible for federal, state, institutional and merit-based aid while engaged in off-campus study and upon their return to UArts, presuming that the student continues to meet the academic requirements of their aid package. Please note that some Named Scholarships may not be applied toward off-campus study.
  • Student pays tuition to UArts. UArts pays tuition at institution where student will study. Student is responsible to the host school for tuition or fees that exceed UArts tuition and fees, and should expect to be billed directly by the host school. Please note that if the tuition and fees for the host school is less expensive than UArts tuition, no refunds will be issued to the student, and financial aid for the semester of study off-campus may be reduced.

Attending an Unaffiliated Institution

Note: Students who are interested in studying at an unaffiliated institution whose tuition is significantly lower than the UArts tuition may be interested in this option.

  • Student takes a Leave of Absence (see link for LOA) for the duration of the off-campus semester.
  • The student will, as a result of taking the Leave of Absence, be ineligible for any financial aid through UArts during the leave of Absence.
  • Upon the student’s return to UArts, the student will be eligible for reinstatement of their aid (both need and merit-based), depending upon their academic record and financial status at the time of return.
  • The student will be responsible for all costs and payments related to study at the unaffiliated institution.

Students who plan to study abroad should apply for financial aid adhering to normal deadlines and procedures. Additionally, such students must provide The University of the Arts Financial Aid Office with the following:

  1. Contact person at coordinating university or college including their address, telephone, and fax numbers.
  2. Power of Attorney, duly executed (if documents will require your signature in your absence).
  3. Consortium Agreement, completed (available from the Financial Aid Office).
  4. Contact Financial Aid Office before final departure. It will be necessary to maintain close contact with our office to assure aid is processed before you leave the country.

Reminders:

  1. The study abroad program must be approved by both the academic dean and the University’s Office of the Registrar. Contact those offices for additional information and procedures.
  2. Students must begin all paperwork at least six months prior to the semester abroad.
  3. In most countries students will not be permitted to earn wages, so they should be prepared to have sufficient spending money.
  4. Students may not use financial aid for unapproved programs abroad. In order to be eligible for financial aid, the student must enroll through a college or university that is approved for participation in the Federal Title IV programs.
  5. Students may not use the extended payment plan (TMS) to pay for tuition.

 

Budgets

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Educational costs include not only the direct cost of tuition and fees, but also the indirect costs of out-of-pocket expenses such as housing, food, books, supplies, and personal expenses, including but not limited to clothing, medical expenses, personal items and transportation. Direct costs reflect the actual amount a student will be billed by the University. Indirect costs are what a typical student might expect for out-of-pocket expenses such as supplies, books, clothing, food, medical expenses, personal items, and transportation over a nine-month period.

These direct and indirect expenses are used in formulating a student’s budget and determining financial need. The Financial Aid Office will assign each student a budget depending on the information provided on the FAFSA. If the budgets shown below differ significantly from the expenses you expect to incur, please inform the Financial Aid Office.

Naturally, individual habits and personal spending patterns will dramatically influence the scale of the indirect costs. Therefore, the budgets that follow are estimates only.


Estimated Expenses for 2008-09

These figures are intended for your use in estimating your costs for the upcoming academic year. Budgets & Tax Info

First Year Undergraduate Commuter Resident/Off-Campus
Tuition (12-18 credits/sem)  $29,500 $29,500
Technology Fee $1,100   $1,100
Dorm/Housing    $7,047
Subtotal $30,600  $37,395
Indirect Expenses    
Books & Supplies   $2,100 $2,100
Housing $4,491  
Food $1,665 $1,665
Personal Expenses $1,665 $1,665
Transportation   $1,215  $909
Estimated Total  $41,736 $43,986

 

Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors CAD Commuter CAD Resident/Off-Campus Non CAD Commuter Non CAD Resident/
Off-Campus
Tuition (12-18 credits/sem)  $29,500    $29,500  $29,500  $29,500
Technology Fee  $1,350   $1,350    $300  $300
Dorm/Housing    $7,047    $7,047
Subtotal  $30,850   $37,897  $29,800  $36,847
Indirect Expenses        
Books & Supplies  $2,100  $2,100  $2,100     $2,100
Housing  $4,491      $4,491
Food  $1,665  $1,665  $1,665  $1,665
Personal Expenses  $1,665  $1,665  $1,665  $1,665
Transportation  $1,215  $909  $1,215   $909
Estimated Total   $41,986  $44,236  $40,936   $43,186

  

Graduate
Museum Exhibition Planning & Design or Art Education
(07-08) Summer MFA All Other Graduate Programs
Tuition (9-18 credits/sem)  $29,500  $19,320 $29,500
Technology Fee $1,850   $300 $300
Subtotal $31,350 $ 19,620 $29,800
Indirect Expenses      
Books & Supplies $2,100   $2,100 $2,100
Housing $8,991   $8,991  $8,991
Food $1,665 $1,665 $1,665
Personal Expenses $1,665 $1,665 $1,665
Transportation $1,215 $1,215 $1,215
Estimated Total  $46,986 $35,256 $45,436

Definitions

Commuters

Students who live within reasonable commuting distance of the University and reside with parents or relatives.

Resident/Off-campus

Students who reside in University-owned housing or who reside in housing that is owned by neither the University nor their parents or relatives. Students who live within commuting distance of the University will not be funded as resident students, or as off-campus students.

Graduate Students

Most graduate students maintain their own homes and have correspondingly higher living expenses. Graduate students who live with parents or relatives will be assigned a commuter budget.

Part-Time Students

Budgets for part-time students are determined on an individual basis.

 

Tuition Tax Benefits

The Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 includes tax credits for education. The Hope Scholarship is a tax credit of up to $1,500 that covers 100 percent of the first $1,000 in qualified tuition and related expenses, and up to 50 percent of the second $1,000, required for enrollment during the first two years of college.

The Hope tax credit is generally available for tuition and fees paid, less grants and scholarships, for classes that begin on or after January 1, 1998. The credit is phased out for single taxpayers with adjusted gross income between $40,000 and $50,000 ($80,000 to $100,000 for joint returns). Students who do not qualify for the Hope Scholarship may qualify for the Lifetime Learning Credit.

For specific information about how these tax credits may affect you, contact your tax professional.

 

Confidentiality and Privacy of Financial Aid Information

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FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974)

Under FERPA, educational privacy and access rights accrue to the student when she/he turns 18 OR enrolls in a post-secondary institution. The University of the Arts is a post-secondary institution. Persons who have applied to but who have not attended the University as an enrolled student are not covered under FERPA. Under institutional policy, applicants are extended the same privacy and access rights to their financial aid information as students.


Applicants, students, and parents should be aware of the following institutional Financial Aid Privacy policies.


The Office of Financial Aid staff is permitted to discuss or otherwise disclose a student’s financial aid information to the following parties:

  1. The student.
  2. The student’s parent(s) whose information appears on the FAFSA.
  3. Other University officials having a legitimate educational reason to know the student’s financial aid information (e.g. staff in the billing office so that they can manage the student’s account).
  4. External agencies and organizations such as guarantors, lenders, state grant agencies, and auditors that have a legitimate reason to know the student’s financial aid information (i.e. staff at such agencies authorized to process loans and grants for the student).
  5. External federal agencies granted such rights under FERPA (e.g. DOE, INS, CSPCA, et cetera). Under FERPA, institutions are required to disclose a student’s information (sometimes without notification to the student) in response to commands from the courts (typically subpoenas) and demands from specific federal agencies. The Financial Aid staff will comply with all lawfully issued demands for information from the entities identified in the FERPA regulations and will (or will not) notify the student as required.

Students and parents should be aware that their signatures on the FAFSA and other financial aid documents (e.g. loan applications) authorize the release of their information to certain federal and state agencies. Please read the FAFSA and other financial aid documents for more information.

Depending upon the scope of the information requested by the student or other authorized parties, the Financial Aid Office may require time to present the records requested. When the information requested cannot be produced immediately the Financial Aid Office may require such time as is permitted under the University’s FERPA policy to retrieve and present the records requested.

The Financial Aid staff is not permitted to discuss or otherwise disclose a student’s financial aid information to others including but not limited to:

  1. The student’s parent(s) or stepparent(s) whose information does not appear on the FAFSA (the non-filing parent) without written permission from the student and the filing parent.
  2. The student’s parent(s) or stepparent(s) whose information does appear on the FAFSA when the parents have separated or divorced and the other parent has been identified as the custodial parent, without written permission from the student and the custodial parent.
  3. High school guidance counselors and teachers.
  4. The student’s spouse.
  5. Interested relatives, neighbors, and friends.

The Office of Financial Aid Staff is not permitted to discuss or otherwise disclose academic information (which includes but is not limited to scholarship eligibility, financial aid eligibility, grades, grade-point average, academic standing, or probationary status) to anyone (except the federal and state agencies responsible for processing the student’s financial aid or having authority under FERPA to access such information) other than the student (whether or not the student is dependent, whether or not the parent pays the invoice) without the student’s written authorization.

Disclosure Authorization

When extraordinary circumstances exist that prevent the student from accessing and understanding Financial Aid information, the Financial Aid staff will discuss normally confidential information with the individual(s) that the student designates on the disclosure authorization form. Students may request a disclosure authorization form from the Financial Aid Office. Students must complete and sign the disclosure authorization form in the Financial Aid Office in the presence of a Financial Aid staff member. Students can rescind the disclosure authorization at any time. Due to the highly sensitive nature of financial aid and academic information, facsimiles, photocopies or mailed disclosure authorization forms will not be accepted.

 

Rights and Responsibilities

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The receipt of financial aid is a privilege, which creates both rights and responsibilities.

Students have the right to know the method used to determine their need; the right to have access to information and records used in determining need; and the right to be awarded aid as equitably as funds permit.

Students applying for financial aid are responsible for accurately portraying financial resources and circumstances and notifying the Financial Aid Office of any changes in status; for applying in a timely manner; and for maintaining satisfactory academic progress and good standing.

Students who fail to maintain adequate progress may be placed on probation. Failure to correct academic deficiency will result in the loss of financial aid until the required credits and grade-point average have been earned.

Students or parents who knowingly provide false information on any financial aid form (financial aid forms include but are not limited to the FAFSA, verification forms, Work Study time cards and loan applications) will be denied financial aid and will be refused for all subsequent years without the possibility of appeal. Additionally, students so identified will be billed for all aid disbursed and may face prosecution by the Department of Education, which may result in fine, imprisonment, or both.

While the Financial Aid Office staff is available to assist students through the application process, it is the student’s responsibility to see to the correctness and completeness of his or her application. If a student receives notification that his/her FAFSA or loan application is incomplete, the student must determine what is necessary to complete the application(s) and submit the required information.

An application for financial aid will have no effect on the decision concerning admission. The admission decision is made without access to financial aid data.

Additional Sources of Financial Aid

A helpful way to begin the search for additional financial assistance is on the Internet at http://www.fastweb.com. Additional financial aid Websites are listed below. Students are cautioned not to pay for financial aid information; these are free websites. The Financial Aid Office also maintains a bulletin board of scholarships.
http://www.pheaa.org
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov
http://www.finaid.org
http://www.fastweb.com
http://www.ed.gov

 

For Additional Information

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Listed below are numbers to call if a student receives an incomplete notification or does not receive notification within six weeks of application filing.
To check the status of your FAFSA:

1-319-337-5665
1-800-4-FEDAID
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov

PHEAA Grant Line
1-800-692-7435
http://www.pheaa.org

PHEAA Loan Line
1-800-692-7392
http://www.pheaa.org


The University of the Arts
1-800-616-ARTS
http://www.uarts.edu
Office of Financial Aid
1-215-717-6170
fax 1-215-717-6178
http://www.finaid@uarts.edu 

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